FOURTH U.S. INFANTRY REGIMENT: HOME of HEROES

4th Infantry, 4th Infantry Regiment, Warrior Battalion 1/4, INF 2/4 INF, 3/4 INF,

Indian Wars (photos courtesy Phil W. Logan)

1st Battalion 4th Infantry Regiment

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2nd Battalion 4th Infantry Regiment

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3rd Battalion 4th Infantry Regiment

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Infantry supporting the withdrawal of cavlary.

West Point photo of Thomas Tipton Thornburgh
While Major in the fourth infantry he was killed in action when his command was ambushed by Ute indians in 1879.

 

 Soldier of Company D, Fourth Infantry circa 1880's

Post Civil War

1st Battalion 4th Infantry Regiment

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*Little Big Horn, *Utes, *Oregon 1855, Oregon 1856, Washington 1855, Washington 1856

2nd Battalion 4th Infantry Regiment

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Little Big Horn, *Utes, *Oregon 1855, Oregon 1856, Washington 1855, Washington 1856, *California 1861

3rd Battalion 4th Infantry Regiment 

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*Little Big Horn, *Utes, *Oregon 1855, Oregon 1856, Washington 1855, Washington 1856

After Appomattox, the regiment returned to the West, now to Fort Laramie. On 31 March 1869 the regiment was consolidated with the original 30th Infantry, and the resulting consolidation retained the 4th Infantry designation. It is of special note that Companies A and B of each organization was carefully blended together to retain their original status. One casualty is noted as Pvt. Jonathan Schewen who died from an Indian attack on 9 December 1869 at Horse River, Wyoming. where the 4th fought with General Crook's Big Horn Expedition.

In 1871, parts of the Fourth went to Louisville to be split into small detachments to chivvy moonshiners about the Kentucky hills for a year, while other parts stayed to fight Indians. Sgt. Patrick Sullivan of the 4th was ambushed and murdered by outlaws on 4 March 1876 at Fort Fetterman, Wyoming and Maj. Thomas T. Thornbourgh was killed in an Indian attack on 29 September 1879 at Milk River, Colorado-during the Meeker Massacre {Thornburgh and 12 others killed and 43 wounded.

The 4th served under Crook in the Battle of the Rosebud, where Crook ordered the infantry to advance to the bluffs on foot in support of his Indian allies. The men of Co. D, 4th Infantry, led by Capt. Avery B. Cain, were the first to reach the crest of the ridge north of the Rosebud, where they opened fire. Companies C, G and H, 9th Infantry, and Co. F, 4th Infantry, supported the charge. The success of the infantry was critical to the outcome of the battle. Their enhanced firepower kept the Indians at bay, while cavalrymen made their horses ready. In moving forward, the foot soldiers found a Crow warrior leaning against a tree, where he urged on his companions, yelling like a madman. This was Bull Snake, whose thighbone had been shattered when he exposed himself on a bravery run. Also wounded here was Fox-Just-Coming-Over-Hill, renamed Old Coyote, shot through the shoulder.

In 1892–93, under Colonel Robert Hall, the Fourth escorted Coxey's Army through Washington and Idaho guarding the Northern Pacific Railway from disorder arising from the march of Coxey's Army.

Utes, September 1879-November 1880

 The Indian agent, N. C. Meeker, at White River Agency (Colorado) became involved in a dispute with Northern Utes in September 1879 and requested assistance from the Army. In response, Maj. T. T. Thornburgh's column of some 200 men (parts of the 5th Cavalry and 4th Infantry) moved out from Fort Steele (Wyoming). On 29 September this force was attacked and besieged in Red Canyon by 300 to 400 warriors. Thornburgh's command was finally relieved by elements of the 9th Cavalry that arrived on 2 October and of the 5th Cavalry under Col. Wesley Merritt who arrived on 5 October, but in the meantime Meeker and most of his staff had been massacred. Before the Utes were pacified in November 1880, several thousand troops, including elements of the 4th, 6th, 7th, 9th, and 14th Infantry had taken the field. In 1906 the Utes of this area left their reservation and roamed through Wyoming, terrorizing the countryside, until they were forced back on their reservation by elements of the 6th and 10th Cavalry.

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