FOURTH U.S. INFANTRY REGIMENT: HOME of HEROES

4th Infantry, 4th Infantry Regiment, Warrior Battalion 1/4, INF 2/4 INF, 3/4 INF,

 

     

 

The Creek and Seminole Campaigns:

 

Those who died or were wounded were:

Francis L. Dade, Brevet Major

Pvt. John Barnes

Pvt. Donald Campbell

Pvt. Marvin Cunningham

Pvt. John Doughty

Pvt. Cornel Donovan 

Pvt. William Downes

Pvt. Enoch Yates

Pvt. Samuel Hall

Pvt. Wiley Jones

Pvt. John Massacre

suffering some casualties:

Pvt. David Hill was killed at Fort Call on Aug. 21, 1836

Pvt. David Mclaughlin 

Pvt. William Walker were killed at Thonotosassa on Aug. 26, 1836

Sgt. Levi Clendening was killed at Chrystal River on Feb. 09, 1837

Pvt. Othiel Lutz

Pvt. John Stewart

Pvt. Bathol Shumard were killed at Okeechobee on Dec. 25, 1837

Pvt. William Foster was killed at Big Cypress on Dec. 20, 1841

 

 

 

 The Mexican-American War:

Killed or Died of Wounds:    
BATTLE OF PALO ALTO, TEXAS, May 8, 1846
Rank Name  Company Date of Death
Captain  John Page    
Pvt. Philip Lee E  
       
BATTLE OF RESACA DE LA PALMA, TEXAS, MAY 9, 1846
1st Lt. Richard E. Cochrane    
Pvt. Robert Mather or Mathews B  
Pvt.  Orlando Pierce D  
Pvt.  Daniel McCarthy or McDardie K  
Pvt.  Richard Eldridge D  
       
BATTLE FOR MONTEREY, MEXICO, SEPT. 20 - 24, 1846  
Cpl.  Benj. Brant E  
Pvt.  Thos. Salsbury A  
Pvt.  Henry Conline D  
Pvt.  Edward Carey D  
Pvt. A. J. Vanceal D  
Pvt.  M. McGrouth E  
Pvt.  John Weeks E  
Pvt.  J. S. Doble E  
Pvt.  P. Andrews E  
Pvt.  Peter Judge E  
1st Lt.  R. H. Graham B  
Pvt.  Andrew Smith D  
       
BATTLES OF CHURUBUSCO AND CONTRERAS, MEXICO AUGUST 19 & 20, 1847
Pvt.  Wm. Johnston A  
Pvt.  Edward Kirnete I  
Pvt.  F. Pinkerton I  
Pvt.  John Alexander B mortally; died Aug. 21, 1847
       
BATTLE OF EL MOLINO DEL REY, MEXICO SEPTEMBER 8, 1847
First Sgt.  John Coyle C  
Pvt.  Frederick Workman C  
Cpl.  John Cameron or Cammeron D  
Pvt.  Gilbert Goodrich D  
Sgt.  Henry Ray E  
Pvt.  Stillman D. Coburn E  
Pvt.  Patrick Ronnan, Ronnau, or Rowman E  
Pvt.  John McClosky F  
Pvt.  James Steele F  
Pvt.  Oswold Drary or Drury A  
Pvt.  Christian or Christain Smallback or Smallbark A  
Pvt.  William Ehrenbaum or Ehrenbein A  
Pvt.  Philip Hassey B  
Pvt.  Jules Gasse D  
Pvt.  Joseph Holybec or Holybee F  
Pvt.  John P. Merrick F  
Pvt.  Philip Felby I  
Pvt.  John Wilson I  
Pvt.  Oscar Wood I  
       
CHAPULTEPEC AND CITY OF MEXICO, SEPTEMBER 13-14, 1847
Lt.  A. J. or P. Rogers D  
Sgt.  William Donegan or Dowagen D  
Sgt.  George Blast B  
Cpl.  James Hagan A  
Pvt.  Conrad Graf A  
Pvt.  Isaac I. or J. Jonson or Johnson A  
Pvt.  Alexander McCoy B  
Pvt.  Harl or Karl Sigmond B  
Pvt.  Michael Kelley or Kelly D  
Pvt.  William Billington E  
Pvt.  Joel Barrom or Barrow E  
Pvt.  Charles Whitty    
First Lt. S. Smith I  
Pvt.  Daniel Bennett B  
Pvt.  Aganna or Aganus Dowis I  
       
NEAR FORT TEXAS, NORTH BANK OF RIO GRANDE, APRIL 1846.
2nd Lt.  Theodoric (or Theodore) H. Porter    
Pvt. Pat Flood    
       
AFFAIR AT HUAMANTLA, MEXICO, OCTOBER 8, 1847  
AND SUBSEQUENT ACTION, OCTOBER 1O & 11, 1847  
Pvt. Teedman    
     

 

Honor Roll 1861 to 1865

List of men from the regiment who were killed in action,  died of  wounds or disease.  The list is incomplete.

1. Abel, C.

2. Allums,

3. Alrice

4. Aschmann, E.

5. Banrall, (Andersonville Prison, Ga.)

6. Barrington, Peter (Gettysburg, Pa.)

7. Becker, William (Gettysburg, Pa.)

8. Begnell, Mathew (Andersonville Prison, Ga.)

9. Bemmer, William

10. Berghauser, August (Antietam,Md.)

11. Bowers, John (Andersonville Prison, Ga.)

12. Boyd, L. (Andersonville Prison, Ga.)

13. Boyer, John (Andersonville Prison, Ga.)

14. Boynten, Henry

15. Brady, Barnard

16. Brailey,

17. Brophy, James

18. Burr, J.L

19. Bauman, Louis (Yorktown, Va.)

20. Carolin, Alexander 2nd Lt. (Petersburg, VA.)

21. Casey, Richard (Antietam,Md.)

22. Carnahan, Lorenzo

23. Caldwell,

24. Christiansen, Edward (2nd Manassas, Va.)

25. Clark, Josiah

26. Clark, Mich

27. Connell, Possibly “Dennis” (Andersonville Prison, Ga.)

28. Demus, V.

29. Doile,

30. Donegan, John

31. Dougharty,

32. Drumming, (Spotsylvania Courthouse, Va.)

33. Dows, James

34. Engers, Christian (Gettysburg, Pa.)

35. Darling

36. Fiedler, Theodore

37. Flannery, John

38. Forcer, David

39. Foster, James (Andersonville Prison, Ga.)

40. Fox, Charles (Mine Run, Va.)

41. Gromley, J.

42. Grainer, Henry (Wilderness, Va.)

43. Granen,

44. Gulvere, David (Andersonville Prison, Ga.)

45. Hopkins, Curley

46. Kay, Robert (Andersonville Prison, Ga.)

47. Keapers, William

48. Kehear, John (Spotsylvania Courthouse, Va.)

49. Kelley, David (Andersonville Prison, Ga.)

50. Lomaire, George

51. Mannix,

52. Mare,W. (Gettysburg, Pa.)

53. Mayfield, Benjamin

54. McCarry, Mitch

55. McCoy, George (Andersonville Prison, Ga.)

56. McCue, James (Spotsylvania Courthouse, Va.)

57. McDonald, James

58. McDonald, Roger (Gettysburg, Pa.)

59. McDonald, (Andersonville Prison, Ga.)

60. McGinley, David

61. McGoom,

62. McGuire, Samuel (Antietam, Md.)

63. McManimus, Peter (Gettysburg, Pa.)

64. McPhail, H.

65. McSim, Edward

66. Moran, John (Andersonville Prison, Ga.)

67. Morrisson, (Gettysburg, Pa.) could be either Robert or Joseph “Morrison”

68. Masterson, Patrick

69. Northrup, Lucius G. (Andersonville Prison, Ga.)

70. Patterson, John

71. Power, Paterik

72. Restell, German (Petersburg, Va.)

73. Riley, John (Gettysburg, Pa.)

74. Rice, James (Gettysburg, Pa.)

75. Robbins,

76. Robinson, Peter (Gettysburg, Pa.)

77. Rogerson,

78. Rourk, John (Antietam,Md.)

79. Simpson, Edward (Mine Run, Va.)

80. Smith, Aaron (Andersonville Prison, Ga.)

81. Sullivan, James

82. Thompson, William (Spotsylvania Courthouse, Va.)

83. Vamlock, James

84. Welch, Nathanial

85. Welsh, James (Spotsylvania Courthouse, Va.)

86. Williams, John (Andersonville Prison, Ga.)

 

 

 

 

 

On July 2, 1901

 

 
  2Lt Allen J. Greer of the 4th Infantry
 
was near Majada, Laguna Province, Philippine Islands when he charged alone an insurgent outpost with his pistol, killing 1, wounding 2, and capturing 3 insurgents with their rifles and equipment. For his actions, 2Lt. Greer received the Medal of Honor.

 

 On 20 November 1899 

 

 

Private John C. Wetherby, Co. L, 4th Infantry,

was near Imus, Luzon, Philippine Islands when he was wounded carrying important orders on the battlefield, unable to walk, he crawled at a great distance in order to deliver his orders. Private Wetherby, received the Medal of Honor for his actions.

 

On November 23, 1901

 

 

 1LT. Louis J. Van Schaick,

was pursuing a band of insurgents, near Nasugbu, Batangas, Philippine Islands, and was the first to emerge from a canyon, and seeing a column of insurgents and fearing they might turn and dispatch his men as they emerged one by one from the canyon, galloped forward and closed with the insurgents, thereby throwing them into confusion until the arrival of others of the detachment. 1Lt. Van Schaick received the Medal of Honor for his actions.

 

Honor Roll from March 1899 to December 1901

 

  The Philippine-American War      
Rank     Name              Company  Cause Awards  
           
Pvt.  William J Harms    L Disease    
Lt.  John C. Gregg    KIA PH  
Pvt.  Algernon A. Gardner G Disease    
Corp. Julius Hohfeld M Disease    
Sgt.  Jacob Boyd M Drowned    
Corp. William Hast H Disease    
Pvt. James McCormick B Disease    
Pvt. Converse Warner G Disease    
Sgt. James Hogan M Disease    
Lt. Ward Cheney   KIA PH  
Pvt. William Coak  B Disease    
Pvt. Daniel Donovan D Disease    
Corp. Peter Goorskey B KIA PH  
Pvt. Charles Hope K Disease    
Pvt. Herbert Miflin B Disease    
Pvt. William Henry D KIA PH  
Art. George Dalts D Disease    
Pvt. Max Neugas E Disease    
Pvt. Thomas Petro M Disease    
Pvt. August Nolte A Disease    
Pvt. Charles Gleerup L KIA PH  
Pvt. William Nichols E Disease    
Pvt. Frank Lampman I Disease    
Pvt. John H Dunn D Disease    
Pvt. Owen Dunn E Disease    
Pvt. Philip Morris L Disease    
Pvt. William Casey G Disease    
Pvt. Isaac Rambo E Disease    
Pvt. Joseph O’Rourke   Disease    
Pvt. Stanislaus Stvan D Disease    
Pvt. Scott Miller G Disease    
Pvt. Alexander Culross K Disease    
Pvt. William Whittencotton I Disease    
Pvt. Gottfried Elfgang C Disease    
Capt. Magnus Hollis   Disease    
Pvt. Frank La Rowe H Disease    
Pvt. Clarence Beall K Disease    
Pvt. Bert Flanders K Disease    
Pvt. John Wetherby L KIA  MOH PH
Pvt. James Pattie G Disease    
Pvt. Otto Unger M Disease    
Pvt. August Erikson C KIA PH  
Pvt. Theodore Gehring C Disease    
Pvt. August Marsch C KIA PH  
Pvt. Frank House F Disease    
Pvt. John Brunner H Disease    
Pvt. James Curran   Disease    
Pvt. Victor Senechal F Disease    
Pvt. Franz Frederick M Drowned    
Sgt.  Thomas Ryan F  Disease    
Pvt.  William McAndrews I Disease    
Pvt.  John Richards D Disease    
Pvt.  Jerry Deaton L Disease    
Pvt.  John Crook E Disease    
Lt.  Henry Way Scouts KIA PH  
Capt.  Charles McQuiston M Fratricide     
Sgt.  Frank Dunn M Fratricide    
Pvt.  Harry Murvin L Disease    
Pvt.  Bernard Smith G Disease    
Pvt.  Edward Davis E Drowned    
Pvt.  Jacob Wiesler G Drowned    
Corp.  William Stephenson I KIA PH  
Pvt.  Louis Silver F Disease    
Pvt. Ashley Council F Disease    
Pvt.  Thomas Knebel F KIA PH  
Pvt.  Axel Fredin M Disease     
  Cook Hugh Nelson  D Suicide    
Pvt.  August Schulz E Disease    
Pvt.  Cesario Torres M Disease    
           

 

On October 7, 1918 

 PFC John L. Barkley, Co. K, 4th Infantry

 On October 7, 1918 

was near Cunel, France. stationed in an observation post half a kilometer from the German line, on his own initiative repaired a captured enemy machine gun and mounted it in a disabled French tank near his post. Shortly afterward, when the enemy launched a counterattack against our forces, PFC Barkley got into the tank, waited under the hostile barrage until the enemy line was abreast of him and then opened fire, completely breaking up the counterattack and killing and wounding a large number of the enemy. Five minutes later an enemy 77-millimeter gun opened fire on the tank pointblank. One shell struck the drive wheel of the tank, but this soldier nevertheless remained in the tank and after the barrage ceased broke up a second enemy counterattack, thereby enabling American forces to gain and hold Hill 25. PFC Barkley received the Medal of Honor for his actions.

 

 

 

 

 


4th US Infantry, 3rd Division, AEF

Honor Roll

 

Rank

Name

Company

Date of Death

 
         

 Pvt.

Clifton Ogier

H

6/8/1918

 

Pfc

Henry Watkins

H

6/6/1918

 

Cpl.

Lenoer Smith

H

6/6/1918

 

Pvt.

Richard Werner

H

6/6/1918

 

Lt.

Norman McCreary II

H

6/15/1918

 

Pfc.

Harry Jones

D

6/14/1918

 

Pvt.

Edward Szyperski

D

6/14/1918

 

Pfc.

Clarence Harris  

A

6/15/1918

 

Pvt.

Peter Stanford

A

6/15/1918

 

Cpl.

William Corner

A

6/16/1918

 

Pvt.

Jos. Gugluzo

D

6/16/1918

 

Pvt.

Joseph Palmer

E

6/16/1918

 

Pvt.

Jos. Socia

I

6/16/1918

 

Pvt.

Waldo H. Crussser

MG.

6/17/1918

 

Cpl.

Richard Haugh 

C

6/17/1918

 

Pvt.

Frederick Gressman

HQ

6/16/1918

 

Pvt.

Morris Krupol

M

6/23/1918

 

Pvt.

James L. Forbes

D

6/19/1918

 

Pvt.

James L. Pilkerton

D

6/21/1918

 

Pvt.

Lawrence Bourgeois

D

6/28/1918

 

Pvt.

John J. Dublinsky

M

7/1/1918

 

Cook

Walter Lafe

K

7/1/1918

 

Pvt.

John Koen

K

7/2/1918

 

Cpl.

Mason Potts

K

7/2/1918

 

Pvt.

Charles Wilson

K

7/4/1918

 

Pvt.

Everette Hubbard

G

7/15/1918

 

Pvt.

Stanley Anderson

A

7/15/1918

 

Pvt.

John Ancomano

A

7/19/1918

 

Pvt.

Calvin Carbaugh

I

7/15/1918

 

Sgt.

Micheal Clanders

A

7/15/1918

 

Pvt.

A. Durft

I

7/15/1918

 

Bugler

Aher Yaffee

I

7/15/1918

 

Pfc.

Lawrence Grunertz

I

7/15/1918

 

Pvt.

Harry Gavelick

A

7/15/1918

 

Pvt.

Roy Johnson

I

7/15/1918

 

Pvt.

Verdie McReynolds

F

7/15/1918

 

Pvt.

James A. Mathivson

A

7/15/1918

 

Pvt.

Noviel Moore

I

7/15/1918

 

Cpl.

William Munsey

I

7/16/1918

 

Bugler

Edward Pennington

A

7/15/1918

 

Cpl.

John Russo

I

7/15/1918

 

Pvt.

Brady Smith

I

7/15/1918

 

Pvt.

Reginald Smith

I

7/15/1918

 

Pvt.

Frank Wilkinson

I

7/15/1918

 

Pvt.

Arnold Borgman

K

7/16/1918

 

Pvt.

Owen Dunn

K

7/15/1918

 

Pvt.

Anas Jackson

M

7/15/1918

 

Pvt.

Bonner Miller

M

7/15/1918

 

Pfc.

Joe Minthrust 

M

7/15/1918

 

Pvt.

Chanceford Stambaugh

K

7/15/1918

 

Pvt.

Steffan Stavrakis

K

7/15/1918

 

Pvt.

Isidore Weinstein

M

7/15/1918

 

Pvt.

Georg T. Worms

H

7/15/1918

 

Pfc.

Harold Fennewill

C

7/15/1918

 

Pvt.

Vern Hyre

I

7/16/1918

 

2nd Lt.

Benjamin Blankenship

L

7/17/1918

 

Major

James B. Nalle

2nd BN

7/23/1918

 

2nd Lt.

Albert H. Bell Jr.

B

7/23/1918

***

2nd Lt.

Terry S. Tarr

B

7/23/1918

 

2nd Lt.

James B. McConnell

B

7/23/1918

***

Pvt.

James W. Keith

L

7/17/1918

 

Pvt.

Solomon Krupnik

L

7/17/1918

 

Pvt.

Radovan Radevick

A

7/19/1918

***

Pvt.

Louis F. Cabisino

C

7/19/1918

***

Pvt.

Morris Wesehauer

L

7/24/1918

 

Sgt.

Raymond Young

L

7/24/1918

 

Pvt.

Walter Arbueie

K

7/25/1918

 

Cpl.

Grover Becker

I

7/25/1918

 

Cpl.

Jesse Carpenter 

C

7/25/1918

 

Cpl.

Jas. Cascia

A

7/25/1918

 

Cpl.

Paul Daron

G

7/25/1918

 

Pvt.

Earl Davidson

E

7/25/1918

 

Pvt.

Marvin Herner

I

7/25/1918

 

Pvt.

James M. Jones

F

7/25/1918

 

Pvt.

Harry Kneer

F

7/25/1918

 

Pvt.

Fred McKenny

C

7/25/1918

 

Pvt.

Carl Norgenson

F

7/25/1918

 

Pvt.

Earl Norman

F

7/25/1918

 

Sgt.

Thomas O'Boyle

F

7/25/1918

 

Pvt.

Claude Pahlman

I

7/25/1918

 

Pvt.

Thomas Seale

F

7/25/1918

 

Pvt.

Walter Van Dine

G

7/25/1918

 

Pvt.

Harry Aberman

I

7/26/1918

 

Pvt.

Leo G. Allen

F

7/26/1918

 

Pvt.

Andrew Dunleavy

F

7/26/1918

 

Pvt.

Jacob Hablitzel jr.

D

7/27/1918

 

Sgt.

Harvey M. Lidwell

A

7/26/1918

***

Pvt.

Robert H. Lotz

F

7/26/1918

 

Pvt.

Noah O. Boivian

G

7/26/1918

 

Pvt.

Alben M. Oliver

A

7/26/1918

 

Pvt.

Lewis Robertson

G

7/26/1918

 

Pvt.

Lorin Asphaugh

D

7/27/1918

 

Pvt.

William Bramel

D

7/27/1918

 

Pvt.

Carl J. Holtgewe

F

7/27/1918

 

Sgt.

Charles S. Wyke

F

7/27/1918

 

Sgt.

Jesse Frank

G

7/23/1918

 

Cpl.

Johnson Lee

C

7/23/1918

 

Pvt.

Luola Antonas

D

7/23/1918

 

Pvt.

John Rassmussen

B

7/23/1918

 

Pvt.

John Rilligose

B

7/23/1918

 

Pvt.

Alexander Sosnowski

I

7/23/1918

 

Pfc.

Ericke Stanarage

B

7/23/1918

 

Pvt.

Emil Vitek

C

7/23/1918

 

Pvt.

W. Wilkins

B

7/23/1918

 

Pvt.

Henry Wood

G

7/23/1918

 

Pvt.

John J. Dublinski

M

7/17/1918

 

Pvt.

John D. McClary

K

7/17/1918

 

Pvt.

James E. Skelton

L

7/19/1918

 

Pvt.

Joseph Betz

F

7/21/1918

 

Cpl.

Bertram Turner

H

7/22/1918

 

Pvt.

Reuben Bick

F

7/23/1918

 

Pvt.

Ralph Gullen

F

7/23/1918

 

Pvt.

Stephan Prebezewski

Med. Det.

7/22/1918

 

1st Lt.

George Breaker

I

7/24/1918

 

2nd Lt.

Joseph Welch

F

7/24/1918

 

1st Lt.

Edwin Elliot

I

7/24/1918

 

Pvt.

Jeff Davis

K

7/24/1918

 

Pvt.

James Finley

K

7/24/1918

 

Pvt.

Henry Finn

Med. Det.

7/24/1918

***

Pvt.

John A. Gombar

K

7/24/1918

 

Cpl.

Ralph O. Greer

K

7/24/1918

 

Cpl.

Rollin Herschberger

K

7/24/1918

 

Cpl.

John Kellar

K

7/24/1918

 

Cpl.

Claude Moreland

I

7/24/1918

 

Pvt.

Russel Moore

M

7/24/1918

 

Pvt.

Franklin H. Perry

K

7/24/1918

 

Pvt.

Mark Scarry

K

7/24/1918

 

Pvt.

Wlliam Reape

L

7/19/1918

 

Pvt.

John Kirkpatrick

I

7/20/1918

 

Pvt.

Hans Dittmar

F

7/21/1918

 

Pvt.

Robert S. Keller

F

7/21/1918

 

Pvt.

Raymond Ross

F

7/21/1918

 

Pvt.

Emil Schipman

F

7/21/1918

 

Pvt.

Joseph Sharlek

F

7/21/1918

 

Cpl.

Louis A. Gemuent

F

7/22/1918

 

Pvt.

Joseph Jurasinski

B

7/22/1918

 

Pvt.

Jinke Merlin

F

7/22/1918

 

Pvt.

John O. Nelson

B

7/22/1918

 

Pvt.

Herbert Slater

F

7/22/1918

 

Pvt.

John W. Trent

I

7/22/1918

 

Pvt.

Warren West

C

7/22/1918

 

Pvt.

Harold H. Willington

H

7/22/1918

 

Pvt.

Emil Robert

D

7/22/1918

 

Cpl.

Ralph Alexander

B

7/23/1918

 

Pvt.

Howard Beckner

G

7/23/1918

 

Pvt.

John Bendy

B

7/23/1918

 

Pfc.

John Gluck

A

7/22/1918

 

Pfc.

Lester C. Cook 

G

7/23/1918

 

Pfc.

Austin Cullen

MG.

7/23/1918

 

Pvt.

Ernest I. Deck

B

7/29/1918

 

Pvt.

William M. Durr

B

7/23/1918

 

Pvt.

Charles Dusold

B

7/23/1918

 

Mech.

Victor Ellig

B

7/23/1918

 

Cpl.

Char C. France

G

7/23/1918

 

Pvt.

Patesy Furey

B

7/23/1918

 

Pvt.

John Harkow

B

7/23/1918

 

Pvt.

Howard Heade

D

7/23/1918

 

Pvt.

James Houska

B

7/23/1918

 

Pvt.

Emil Hutchings

G

7/23/1918

 

Major

James Nalle

3rd BN.

7/23/1918

***

Pvt.

Aboil Snyder

A

7/26/1918

+++

Cpl.

Conrad Burk

A

7/26/1918

 

Pvt.

Joe Leaver

E

7/29/1918

 

Pvt.

Frank Base

E

7/27/1918

 

Pfc.

Christos Spyrou

E

7/27/1918

 

Pvt.

Horace Gossett

G

7/28/1918

 

Sgt.

Morris Schaffer

B

7/28/1918

 

Pvt.

George Wait

A

7/28/1918

***

Pvt.

Williard Ball

H

7/29/1918

 

Pvt.

Joseph Feldman

G

7/29/1918

 

Pvt.

Charles Johnson

G

7/29/1918

 

Cpl.

Evertte Johnson

H

7/29/1918

 

Pvt.

Otto Louis

E

7/31/1918

 

Pvt.

Lawrence Martin

G

7/29/1918

 

Pvt.

Willie K. Murray

B

5/29/1918

 

Cpl.

Geo. Moore

G

7/29/1918

 

Pvt.

Georgen Reibling

G

7/29/1918

 

Cpl.

Ellwood Roe

E

7/29/1918

 

Pvt.

Gilbert Sutherland

G

7/29/1918

 

Pvt.

Arrick Gray

G

7/29/1918

 

Pvt.

James Harty

G

7/29/1918

 

Pvt.

John Lyons

G

7/29/1918

 

Sgt.

Frank Bukoski

H

7/30/1918

 

Pfc.

Thomas Hensley

H

7/30/1918

+++

Pvt.

Daniel Poplin

H

7/30/1918

 

Sgt.

Elmer Allison Mess

K

7/24/1918

 

Pvt.

John Keller

K

7/24/1918

 

Cpl.

Goe. Stewart

D

7/24/1918

 

Pvt.

Mayo Taggert

L

7/25/1918

 

Pvt.

Micheal Kuzina

A

7/26/1918

 

Pvt.

Frank Anderson

H

7/27/1918

 

Pvt.

Mathias Colling

F

7/28/1918

 

Pvt.

Phillip Consentine

G

7/28/1918

 

Cook

Thomas Doherty

I

7/28/1918

 

Pvt.

Phillip H. Lucas

A

7/28/1918

 

Pvt.

Aboil E. Snow

I

7/27/1918

 

Pvt.

Edward Hurt

F

7/29/1918

 

Pvt.

Louis Otto

E

7/29/1918

 

Cpl.

Lee Stroup

C

7/29/1918

 

Pvt.

Frank Laughram

G

7/30/1918

 

Pvt.

Samuel Solomon

I

7/30/1918

 

Pvt.

Ray Henderson

D

9/24/1918

 

Pvt.

Jerry Grocco

C

8/1/1918

 

Pvt.

Daniel Pietrogiacomini

F

8/6/1918

 

Pvt.

Leonard Sword

H

8/1/1918

 

Pvt.

Leonard Snyder

F

8/2/1918

 

SSgt.

Robert Clark

K

8/3/1918

 

Pvt.

John Conamal

Supply

8/4/1918

 
 

Reinhard Poeppelmeier

F

8/4/1918

 

Pvt.

Albert Pohlman

G

8/4/1918

 

Pvt.

James Coyler

G

8/2/1918

 

Cpl.

Walter Simmons

G

8/2/1918

 

Pvt.

George Wojciechowski

 

8/9/1918

 

Pvt.

Frank Miller

C

8/7/1918

 

Pvt.

Raymond Miller

L

8/15/1918

 

Pvt.

Frank Dalamount

D

8/21/1918

 
 

Mike Lumbert

E

9/16/1918

 
 

Andrew Wheeler

C

9/16/1918

 
 

Gabriel Ambrosia

A

9/30/1918

 
 

John Buffton

K

9/30/1918

 
 

Perry Epley

B

9/30/1918

 
 

Harry Krioinsky

G

9/30/1918

 

Pfc.

Isadore Lespo

L

9/30/1918

 

Pvt.

John McDonough

B

10/8/1918

 
 

Owen Palmer

K

9/30/1918

 
 

Max Schwantz

A

9/30/1918

 
 

Elvin Schwartzbaum

HQ

9/30/1918

 
 

Mike Sutter

B

9/30/1918

 

Pfc.

Thomas Tidball

H

9/30/1918

 

Pvt.

William Schramm

D

9/30/1918

 

Pvt.

William Longe

G

9/28/1918

 

Pvt.

Leo Murrill

L

9/28/1918

 

Pvt.

Robert A. Fitzner

D

10/1/1918

 

Cpl.

Louis Kline

HQ

10/1/1918

 

Pvt.

Henry Rose

F

10/1/1918

 

Pvt.

Gabriel Cohn

H

10/1/1918

 

Pvt.

Lodize Palo

B

10/21/1918

 

Pvt.

James Burdick

E

10/2/1918

 

Pvt.

Joseph Mott

L

10/1/1918

 

Pvt.

Lloyd Smith

A

10/1/1918

 

Pvt.

Ray Walker

G

10/1/1918

 

Sgt.

Walter L. Krusenklaus

F

10/6/1918

 

Pvt.

Bernard Blohm

B

10/6/1918

 

Major

Roy Smyth

1st BN.

10/6/1918

***

2nd Lt.

John Baldwin

MG.

10/6/1918

 
 

Hirche Feinberg

Med.

10/6/1918

***

1st Lt.

Harry Slaymaker

F

10/6/1918

 

Pvt.

O.T. Heintz

A

10/8/1918

 

Pvt.

Milton J. Norman

D

10/8/1918

 

2nd Lt.

John A. Paton

D

10/8/1918

 

Cpl.

Steve Combs

E

10/16/1918

***

 
ANDERSON, Magnus
U. S. Army
Age 27, Nashotah
Private 4th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division
KIA Oct 14, 1918
Buried at: Plot G Row 02 Grave 09
Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery
Romagne, France
       

***(Posthumously awarded Distinguished Service Cross)

+++ (Posthumously received citation for Bravery)

   

Note: This list is incomplete and will be updated

 



 
 
During WWII
at
ATTU
 
Killed in Action
 
John N. Adams
Lyle J. Adams
Woodrow Anderson
Wayne A. Barnes
Claude Barrett
Elmer Blomquist
Charles J. Blazevich
Charles M. Bane, Jr.
Luther G. Brewer
Paul Chounard
Richard S. Clark
Edward Y. Daniel
Lloyd A. Edwell
Robert E. Fine
Ross Galati
 
Kieth N. Garvie
Richard Hall
Donald G. Hanson
Warner P. Hanson
Howard E. Heine
Oliver Hilborn
Howard W. Hoelscher
Homer R. Hood
Arthur R. Huebner
Claude J. Hunter
Albert L. Jensen
Harold M. Jewell
James C. Jones
Ralph F. Joseph
 
Leonard J. Kaufman
Anthony Konwent
Henry H. Krause
Frank Krupa
Norman C. Lohi
Bert Lucken
Frederick V. McDonald
Patrick J. McDonald
John M. Munro
Duane Murchison
Donald B. Newman
Melvin F. Nordlund
Russel L. Payton
Joseph P. Prendergast
John L. Rands
Robert C. Reeder
Kelly M. Robbins
Lonnie C. Sands
Thomas A. Schoonover
George W. Schroth, Jr.
Arthur S. Shapiro
Harry R. Sieben
Cecil L. Siefke
Maurice Smith
Kenneth G. Washburn
Marshall Weimer
Nils O. Wiker
Charles B. Young
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The above are not official, The Fourth I.R did not serve during the Vietnam.
 

 


 

Cold War Era

 

Company A (Apaches) 

was stationed in Kornwestheim (near Stuttgart); 

HHC (Hurons) and

Company B (Blackfeet)

were stationed at Nelson Kaserne in Neu Ulm; and,

Company C (Cherokees)

was stationed at Wharton Barracks in Heilbronn.

The 2nd Battalion 4th Infantry participated in major exercises each winter at training areas such as Baumholder, Hohenfels Hohenfels, Wildflecken, and Graffenwoehr.

This helped to prepare the 2/4th infantry soldiers for the possibility of encounters with Warsaw Pact military forces in the event of an assault on the missile sites themselves.

This was considered a very real possibility during the years of the Cold War.

In addition each of the line companies rotated each year to Doughboy City, Berlin to train in Military Operations in an Urban Terrain (MOUT)

 

On August 18, 1971,

 

The Heavy Mortar Platoon, HHC 2/4 Infantry Regiment

was being transported by helicopter from Ludwigsburg to Grafenwohr, Germany for a live fire training exercise. At some point en route the rear rotor of the CH47 malfunctioned and the helicopter crashed and exploded in Pegnitz, Germany killing all on board.

 

PFC Vernon L. Ailstock Jr

PFC Michael L. Annis

SP4 Fernando Apodaca (Ft. Bliss Cemetery Apodaca, Fernando Sr, b. 05/02/0045, d. 08/18/1971, US Army, SP/4, Res: El Paso, TX, Plot: I 0 2520, bur. 09/02/1971)

SGT Terry E. Bowerman
PFC Samuel M. Cherry
PFC Mark P. Connors
PFC Raymond H. Cork
SGT Harold D. Dillaman Jr
PFC David P. Dunks
1LT John E. Echterling
PFC John P. Egelund
PFC Charles E. Fife
PFC Raymond T. Gadboise
SGT George J. Gongaware
PFC Roger M. Hartman
PFC Paul E. Hickson
PFC Lawrence H. Karaschin

 

PFC Arthur R. Kearney
PFC Eric L. Landry
PFC Edward A. Monnin Jr
PFC Eddie W. Nichols
PFC David A. Person
PFC Ronald R. Pestka
1LT Henry L. Pittard Jr
SGT Christopher W. Pyzik
SP5 Russell L. Schober
PFC Ronald F. Scholl
SSG Paten L. Smith
PFC David W. Stover
PFC Noel Velez
PFC Jeffrey M. Vickerman
PFC Clarence C. West
PFC Richard Willis

 

Pegnitz Memorial today

 

 

 
2nd Battalion 4th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade 10th Mountain Division
 
 

During 2006, the 2nd Battalion, 4th Infantry

formed the core of a task force that deployed to Zabol Province in eastern Afghanistan for Operation Enduring Freedom. Along with other elements of the 4th Brigade, 10th Mountain Division, 2-4 Infantry and TF Boar conducted combat operations in support of Combined Forces Command Afghanistan and the International Security Assistance Force.

Since July 2006 and still continuing into 2009,

the 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry

relieved its sister battalion in Zabol Province, Afghanistan, as part of ISAF's assumption of responsibility for the province. As part of TF Zabul, nominally under Romanian command, 1-4 maintained a reinforced infantry company in the mountainous northern regions of the province, responsible for all combat operations in that area.

The battalion has rotated companies every 7 to 8 months, starting with C Company, followed in turn by B, A, and D companies. The battalion is currently in its second rotation of companies, and the combat deployment continues through the present day. While each task force is deployed, the remaining companies of 1-4 continue their OPFOR mission in Hohenfels, Germany as well as training for their next combat mission in Afghanistan.

2-4 Infantry deployed again in late 2007 to Iraq with 4th Brigade, 10th Mountain Division, this time for 15 months as part of the "surge" strategy. Their deployment ended January 2009.

 

 

 

1st BN. 4th  Infantry Regiment

 


 

(ROULF) were posthumously honored during a ceremony at ROULF Headquarters in Bucharest, Jan. 16. The Soldiers of the 1st Bn.,4th Inf. Regt. (1-4) were attached to the ROULF, when they were killed Jan. 9, in the Zabul Province of Afghanistan, of wounds suffered whenan improvised explosive device detonated near their vehicle in Jaldak.

 

The three soldiers were assigned to the 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment, based in Hohenfels, Germany.

Arizmendez's remains arrived Friday morning at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware.

"They were courageous soldiers who faced danger every day to protect our freedoms," Gov. Arnold Schwarzanegger said in a statement issued on behalf of himself and First Lady Maria Shriver. "During this difficult time, we extend our deepest sympathies to the families and friends of these honorable men."

Capitol flags are being flown at half-staff in honor of the fallen soldiers.

Arizmendez attended St. Catherine's Military Academy in Anaheim for middle school and graduated in 1994. In the school's student yearbook, Arizmendez said his ambition was to become an accountant, a salesman or an attorney.

Sister Maria Dei Fatima Foulkner, 83, works at the school and said she would occasionally speak with Arizmendez's mother.

"It was so dangerous, and she was praying that he would come home safely," the nun said.

Arizmendez's family lives near downtown Anaheim and St. Catherine's. An American flag was displayed from the porch. No one answered the door, and neighbors said they didn't know the family well.

By Friday afternoon, more than 400 people had joined memorial page for Arizmendez on Facebook. Those who knew him best remembered him as a devoted family man who was never too busy to find time to help his family, friends and his country. "I don't think "No" was a word that was in his vocabulary," wrote a fellow soldier.

A picture posted on his memorial page shows a smiling Arizmendez with his wife Barbara and their two children, Justin and Jenny. Other pictures show a much more serious Arizmendez stationed in Germany and in Afghanistan.

The soldiers were supporting Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan.

The three soldiers were assigned to the 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment, based in Hohenfels, Germany.

Arizmendez's remains arrived Friday morning at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware.

"They were courageous soldiers who faced danger every day to protect our freedoms," Gov. Arnold Schwarzanegger said in a statement issued on behalf of himself and First Lady Maria Shriver. "During this difficult time, we extend our deepest sympathies to the families and friends of these honorable men."

Capitol flags are being flown at half-staff in honor of the fallen soldiers.

Arizmendez attended St. Catherine's Military Academy in Anaheim for middle school and graduated in 1994. In the school's student yearbook, Arizmendez said his ambition was to become an accountant, a salesman or an attorney.

Sister Maria Dei Fatima Foulkner, 83, works at the school and said she would occasionally speak with Arizmendez's mother.

"It was so dangerous, and she was praying that he would come home safely," the nun said.

Arizmendez's family lives near downtown Anaheim and St. Catherine's. An American flag was displayed from the porch. No one answered the door, and neighbors said they didn't know the family well.

By Friday afternoon, more than 400 people had joined memorial page for Arizmendez on Facebook. Those who knew him best remembered him as a devoted family man who was never too busy to find time to help his family, friends and his country. "I don't think "No" was a word that was in his vocabulary," wrote a fellow soldier.

A picture posted on his memorial page shows a smiling Arizmendez with his wife Barbara and their two children, Justin and Jenny. Other pictures show a much more serious Arizmendez stationed in Germany and in Afghanistan.

The soldiers were supporting Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan.

 

 

 An Army carry team carries the transfer case containing the remains of Army Staff Sergeant Marc A. Arizmendez of Anaheim, Calif. upon his arrival at Dover Air Force Base, Del.on Friday, July 9, 2010. The Department of Defense announced the death of Army Staff Sergeant Marc A. Arizmendez who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan.

Staff Sergeant Marc A. Arizmendez and his wife, Barbara, before his deployment. (Facebook)

 

 

Staff Sgt. Marc A. Arizmendez, 30, of Anaheim, Calif.

The three soldiers were assigned to the 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment, based in Hohenfels, Germany.

Arizmendez's remains arrived Friday morning at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware.

"They were courageous soldiers who faced danger every day to protect our freedoms," Gov. Arnold Schwarzanegger said in a statement issued on behalf of himself and First Lady Maria Shriver. "During this difficult time, we extend our deepest sympathies to the families and friends of these honorable men."

Capitol flags are being flown at half-staff in honor of the fallen soldiers.

Arizmendez attended St. Catherine's Military Academy in Anaheim for middle school and graduated in 1994. In the school's student yearbook, Arizmendez said his ambition was to become an accountant, a salesman or an attorney.

Sister Maria Dei Fatima Foulkner, 83, works at the school and said she would occasionally speak with Arizmendez's mother.

"It was so dangerous, and she was praying that he would come home safely," the nun said.

Arizmendez's family lives near downtown Anaheim and St. Catherine's. An American flag was displayed from the porch. No one answered the door, and neighbors said they didn't know the family well.

By Friday afternoon, more than 400 people had joined memorial page for Arizmendez on Facebook. Those who knew him best remembered him as a devoted family man who was never too busy to find time to help his family, friends and his country. "I don't think "No" was a word that was in his vocabulary," wrote a fellow soldier.

A picture posted on his memorial page shows a smiling Arizmendez with his wife Barbara and their two children, Justin and Jenny. Other pictures show a much more serious Arizmendez stationed in Germany and in Afghanistan.

They died July 6 at Qalat, Afghanistan, of wounds sustained when insurgents attacked their vehicle with an improvised explosive device.  They were assigned to the 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment, Hohenfels, Germany. 

                Killed were: 

                 

Army Spc. Roger Lee, 26, of Monterey; among 3 killed by roadside bomb

Two years ago on his first tour of Afghanistan, he was in a Humvee when a roadside bomb killed his driver and translator. This time he was in a heavily fortified vehicle, but the blast was too strong.

MILITARY DEATHS

August 15, 2010|By Garrett Therolf, Times Staff Writer

Roger Lee had settled into a happy life on California's Central Coast with his girlfriend, infant daughter and a good job working as an auto mechanic — yet he longed for one thing more.

"He wasn't fully satisfied," said his brother Linstun. "He wanted to serve his nation. He had wanted to do it since he was 10 years old."

On July 6, three years after quitting his job at the car dealership, Lee's platoon was on patrol in Qalat in southeast Afghanistan when a powerful roadside bomb tore his vehicle apart. The explosion killed him and two other members of the 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment based in Hohenfels, Germany — Staff Sgt. Marc A. Arizmendez, 30, of Anaheim, and Pfc. Michael S. Pridham, 19, of Louisville, Ky.

Lee, a 26-year-old native of Monterey and graduate of Monterey High School, has been remembered in the weeks since his death as a fearless adventurer who loved hot rods, his country and family.

"He had a passion for everything. Everything he did, he put his heart and soul into it. He would get everything done for others before he would take care of himself," said his childhood friend Joe Solis, 27, who worked alongside Lee at a grocery store and remembers play-fighting in the parking lot after their shifts.

"Roger had a lot of passion for martial arts and combat-style sports," Solis said. "I think that's what drew him to the military."

Linstun Lee said his younger brother, an Army specialist, found the military rewarding, even if his phone calls home sometimes conveyed a growing sense of unease with his mission.

The first trouble came two years ago during his first tour in Afghanistan. He was on patrol in a Humvee when a roadside bomb exploded, killing Lee's driver and translator.

Lee called his brother and said, "Hey man, if the Red Cross come to your house, don't worry."

"Hey, I think you overcome the worst part," his brother recalls replying.

But on the second tour — just months after marrying his wife, Evilina — Lee told his brother that the mission had seemed to become even more perilous.

"They were going to uncharted territories and stretching the boundaries of the American presence," Linstun Lee said.

"He felt that they weren't really making an impact because the insurgents were running to Pakistan, where the Americans couldn't go. That's the problem: the limitations, the rules of war."

On June 30, Lee called his brother for the last time.

"Hey bro, I'm not going to lie to you, it's pretty sketchy," Linstun Lee recalled him saying, with fear creeping into his voice.

A week later, Lee was traveling in an MRAP, or mine resistant ambush protected vehicle, heavily fortified to withstand roadside bombs. But the explosion was too strong.

garrett.therolf@latimes.com

Two memories of Marc A. Arizmendez

After days of sifting through decades of memories about my brother, I realize that many of the most recent exchanges with him when I visited him in Germany in early 2010. The snow was 2 feet high, but he and I would walk outside so he could smoke a cigarette after dinner.

The conversations were pretty one-sided: I was talking, and Marc listening, taking occasional drags and cupping the cigarette in his hands.

After I would make my point and run out of steam, I t typically looked to him for some sort of response. Then, in the style of a world-weary old cowboy, silent with but a few well placed words, he'd give me a wry smile that gave me pause to perhaps reconsider my intentions -- or move ahead.

In looking back at these conversations, I now understand that the way he exhaled his cigarette smoke and even turning his head were the signals to his opinion on an issue. It may have been his 11 years as an Army soldier that taught him to listen, think and then do, but wherever this Yoda-like persona initially developed, I now appreciate what, that at 30 years old, he was teaching me.

When I was a freshman in high school, I got a call from my mom at the hospital, where she had just given birth to Marc. She had asked me to help name him, and I thought that the alternate spelling of his name was a great choice.
I was always looking afterhim until I went away to college and our age differences helped to create more distance between us.

I did think of him as a boy for much of his life, but as he progressed through the Army, he displayed that lead-by-example quiet confidence that caught me by pleasant surprise and grew to admiration and pride.

Marc, I miss you and I love you. I will find ways to make YOU proud of me. It hurts a lot now but why shouldn't it? b/c you are special.

— Al Arizmendez
July 11, 2010 at 3:11 a.m.

 

Staff Sgt. Marc A. Arizmendez

Marc A. Arizmendez, 30

As a boy, he was a little fighter, a rabble rouser — and smart. He loved to take apart his toys, especially the trucks, and put them back together again.
— Amelia Arizmendez, mother
Arizmendez died July 6 of wounds sustained when insurgents attacked his vehicle with an improvised explosive device in Qalat, Afghanistan. Specialist Roger Lee of Monterey, and Private 1st Class Michael S. Pridham, 19, of Louisville, Kentucky were also killed in the incident. On a Facebook memorial page created by his older brother, Arizmendez is remembered by friends as a great husband, father and soldier who was always willing to help a friend.

 

July 06, 2010
19, of Louisville, Ky.; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment, Hohenfels, Germany; died July 6 at Qalat, Afghanistan, of wounds sustained when insurgen... [Read More]
 
July 06, 2010
26, of Monterey, Calif.; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment, Hohenfels, Germany; died July 6 at Qalat, Afghanistan, of wounds sustained when insurge... [Read More]
 
 
9/11 World Trade Towers NYC 2nd Terror Attack 
 
 
 

IRAQ & AFGHANISTAN

 5397

Deaths by Conflict

Operation Iraqi Freedom: 4398
Operation Enduring Freedom: 1148

 

Deaths by Branch

Marines: 1228
Air Force: 104
Navy: 153
Army: 4032
Coast Guard: 1
Air National Guard: 1

Total: 5519

Deaths by Age

18-22: 2493
23-28: 1881
28-35: 1124
35-45: 656
45+: 125

 

2009-07-0630,  of North Carolina; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment, Joint Multinational Readiness Center, Hohenfels, Germany; died July 6 in Argandab District, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when an improvised explosive device detonated near his vehicle.

 

 

Procession of pride honors

Capt. Mark Garner

By REBECCA TRIPLETT JOHNSON

For The Record

 

Silent tributes sometimes make the biggest statements.

That was the case last Wednesday afternoon as many Wilkes and Surry county residents lined roadways along Wood Wallace Drive, Airport Road, N.C. 268 East into North Bridge Street in Elkin, Main Street and finally Memorial Park Drive to honor and celebrate the life of Captain Mark Andess Garner and salute the ultimate sacrifice he made while serving in the United States Army. 

Garner was killed July 6, 2009 due to his injuries from an IED blast in the Agrandab District of Afghanistan.   

A native of State Road and a graduate of Elkin High School and the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, Captain Garner, 30, rose to the rank of Commander of B Company, 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment, stationed in Hohenfels, Germany.

Upon completion of the Infantry Officer’s Basic Course and Ranger School, Captain Garner was assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 325th Airborne Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne, as well as the 2nd Battalion, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment at Fort Bragg.  While there he served as an Infantry Rifle Platoon Leader, Company Executive Officer, and Battalion S-1 where Captain Garner spent two tours in Iraq.  Upon completion of the Infantry Captains’ Career Course in December 2006, he was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment where he served as the Battalion S-4 and Bravo Company Commander.  He was recently serving as a Company Commander in Afghanistan.

Captain Mark A. Garner's awards and decorations include the Army Commendation Medal (2 Oak Leaf Clusters), the Army Achievement Medal (1 Oak Leaf Cluster), the National Defense Service Medal, the Iraq Campaign Medal, the Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, the Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, the Overseas Service Ribbon, the Combat Infantryman Badge, the Parachutist Badge, and the Ranger Tab. Posthumously, he was awarded the Bronze Star Medal, the Purple Heart, the Afghanistan Campaign Medal, and the NATO Medal with International Security and Assistance Force clasp.

Garner's remains arrived at the Wilkes County Airport on Wednesday morning.   An Army Honor Guard stood at attention beside the jet as the flag draped coffin was lowered to their arms and was somberly and ceremoniously taken to the waiting hearse.  Garner's widow, Nickayla Myers-Garner stood with the guard and was escorted to the waiting motorcade. 

Uniformed members of VFW Post 1142 saluted while standing at attention on the tarmac.  Family, friends and strangers alike, gathered around the airport and along Wood Wallace Drive at 12 noon as the procession began the final journey to Garner's hometown of Surry County. 

The procession included the hearse and family cars, police and sheriff vehicles, Knottville Fire Department trucks, Wilkes County ambulance and multiple motorcycles decorated with American flags.

Ribbons of yellow and red white and blue decorated many yards and trees along the procession's route.  Children and adults of all ages waved flags, saluted and placed their right hands over their hearts as the procession passed them by. 

 Some took time off from work and lunch hours to stand along the highway.  Others sat in their yards and vehicles. 

Many who saluted Garner were fellow soldiers and sailors of several generations who had also spent years of their lives serving their country.  Their eyes swelled with tears and their hearts with pride as the procession neared their vantage points. 

One survivor of WWII, who preferred to be anonymous said,  "That boy is a true hero in my book.  There are many of us who survived the pits of hell in many different wars but could have easily not been so lucky.  Garner gave his life for his country and I am honored to be able to stand here and give him my salute and respect for who he was and what he did."

Garner's family received friends Friday evening at Elkin's First Baptist Church. Funeral services were held Saturday at 2 p.m. at Elkin First Baptist Church, followed by a procession with Caisson.  A 21-gun salute followed by taps echoed through the trees and streets as Garner's body was laid to rest in the Hollywood Cemetery.

Garner had told his family of his wishes to create a scholarship for students attending Elkin High School.  In granting that wish, his family has now started the Mark A. Garner Scholarship Fund for the purpose of providing an education to another Elkin student. In lieu of flowers or for anyone who wants to make a donation, checks can be made out to Captain Mark A. Garner Scholarship Fund and mailed to 105 Westover Drive in Elkin.   

From combat fire and loud explosions of war Garner returned to a silent barrage of honor and patriotic spirit in what was a peaceful journey back to the home and people he loved in Wilkes and Surry counties.
 

 

Published: July 19, 2009

 

Those who served with Capt. Mark A. Garner were there. So were neighbors and friends. Some there had never met Garner but thought that it was important to pay their respects to a man who died fighting for his country.

Garner, 30, was killed in Afghanistan on July 6 when the Humvee he was riding in struck an improvised explosive device (IED).

Yesterday afternoon, hundreds of people attended his funeral at First Baptist Church in Elkin.

Capt. Doug Sackett drove up from Fort Bragg "to honor a great guy."

"We were in the 82nd Airborne together," Sackett said. "He loved the Army. He always had a smile. It was contagious."

Garner's positive attitude motivated everyone, he said. "Mark was the kind of guy you wanted to emulate."

Garner was the commander of Company B, 1st Battalion of the 4th Infantry Regiment, stationed in Hohenfels, Germany..

Army Capt. Mark Garner and his wife were stationed in Germany in December 2008

 

Many others at First Baptist had known Garner long before he entered the military. Melba Nance lived in the same neighborhood as the Garners and watched Garner grow up. Ruthann McComb and Pam Colbert are colleagues of Garner's mother, Beth Garner. Hope Layell was the scorekeeper at many of the sports games Garner played in.

"I've known him my whole life," Layell said.

It's a small community, they said, where, one way or another, people are connected to each other.

"Everybody knows everybody," Layell said.

And, they said, it seems as if everyone in the community has felt the loss. Wherever people have gone recently -- work, ballgames, church -- everyone has been talking about Garner's death.

"It's a real close community," said Capt. Jeff Poteate of the Elkin Police Department. "It's family. Anytime one member of the family is affected, every member of the family is affected."

Garner graduated from Elkin High School in 1997 and went on to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. He was married to Nickayla Myers-Garner, who also graduated from Elkin High School.

By 1 p.m., people were already lining up outside the sanctuary for the funeral, which was scheduled to begin at 2. Once the sanctuary was filled, people filled the chapel and the fellowship hall.

Like Sackett, many people had driven a ways to get there. Jason Mazino and his wife, Kristyn, drove three hours down from Lexington, Va.

As a sergeant, Mazino served under Garner at Fort Bragg.

"It meant a lot to be here," Mazino said. "The thing I liked best about Mark was he cared about the soldier. He cared about his guys, and he took care of his guys."

Some people -- many of whom didn't know Garner or his family directly -- chose to pay their respects by waiting across the street from the church.

David Singleton was one of those.

"He paid the ultimate price," Singleton said.

Mamie Darnell said that having a son-in-law who returned safely from serving in Iraq, she knows how lucky she is.

"It could have been us with this grieving," Darnell said.

Vicky McNeill said, "He was serving his country. I thank him."

McNeill brought up the yellow ribbons that many people throughout the area have been displaying outside their homes to honor Garner. She had never seen so many on display at once, she said.

"He may not have known the people, but he has touched their heart," she said.

Arrangements had been made for a horse-drawn caisson -- a two-wheeled wagon -- to take the casket from the church to the cemetery, and, watching it come down the hill toward the church, McNeill said, "That is such a lonesome sight."

The driver backed up the caisson up to the steps leading out of the sanctuary, and, after the service, fellow servicemen loaded Garner's flag-draped casket onto it. With the family following behind in a limousine, the servicemen escorted the casket down Elkin's main street before turning up the hill to the cemetery.

The procession went under the closed N.C. 67 bridge. To honor Garner, sisters Christine Elliott and Darlene Crews bought a 5-by-9½-foot American flag and draped it from the bridge.

"It's the least we could do," Elliott said.

 

 

 

Hohenfels pays tribute to ‘quiet professional’

Capt. Mark A. Garner was killed by roadside bomb in Afghanistan

 
Nickayla Myers-Garner pays respects to her late husband, Capt. Mark A. Garner, at a Wednesday morning memorial ceremony at Hohenfels, Germany. The Team Blackfoot, 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment commander was killed by a roadside bomb in Afghanistan on July 6 

HOHENFELS, Germany — Members of the Hohenfels community bid farewell Wednesday to the commander of Team Blackfoot, 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment, who was killed July 6 while serving in southern Afghanistan.

Capt. Mark A. Garner, 30, died after his Humvee was struck by a roadside bomb during a patrol in Zabul province, where 1-4 companies have served under a Romanian battalion task force in recent years.

The Elkin, N.C., West Pointer is the third senior 1-4 officer killed or injured in Afghanistan in the past year.

In January, the unit’s senior officer in Zabul at the time, Maj. Brian M. Mescall, 33, of Hopkinton, Mass., was killed in a roadside bombing along with two other members of the unit.

The leader Garner succeeded in Afghanistan, former Team Cherokee commander, Capt. Terry Howell, was medically evacuated back to Germany with gunshot wounds sustained in an enemy attack last August, but returned to Zabul early this year to oversee his men’s return home.

 

 

Photo courtesy of U.S. Army
Capt. Mark A. Garner
 

 Lt. Col. Raphael Parades, 1-4 commander, said Garner was killed after his vehicle broke down during a patrol from the isolated Forward Operating Base Baylough to FOB Lane. Garner chose to ride in a vehicle driven by U.S. Navy explosive ordnance disposal specialists, he said.

Petty Officer 2nd Class Tony Michael Randolph, 22, of Henryetta, Okla., also died in the blast, and two other sailors were injured, according to an Army news release.

Navy Adm. Mike Mullen, Navy Rear Adm. James J. Shannon, Army Brig. Gen. Michael T. Harrison Sr. and Col. Manson Morris pay their respects as an Army carry team transfers the remains of Capt. Mark A. Garner July 8 at Dover Air Force Base, Del. Admiral Mullen is the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and Admiral Shannon is the commander of the Naval Warfare Center. General Harrison is the director of Joint and Futures in the Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, G8, Headquarters, Department of the Army. Colonel Morris is the 436th Airlift Wing commander. (U.S. Air Force photo/Roland Balik)

 

On his way to Bucharest, Romania, where a service would be held for Garner, Parades said that while he believes the Taliban are targeting U.S. officers, in this case, he thought Garner was just unlucky.

During a memorial for Garner at the Hohenfels Theater, his wife, Nickayla Myers-Garner, of Jonesville, N.C., and other family members wiped away tears as soldiers talked about the fallen officer.

Capt. Bill Bradley, executive officer for 1-4’s Headquarters and Headquarters Company, said Garner had completed Ranger school and done two combat tours in Iraq.

 

A U.S. Army carry team transfers the remains of Capt. Mark A. Garner at Dover Air Force Base, Del.,

July 8, 2009.

 

"Garner was known by his peers to be an approachable leader who always had a smile on his face, no matter how stressful the environment," he said.

Battalion executive officer Maj. Sean Fisher said Garner loved to travel and took weekend trips to countries all over Europe.

"He planned to be a foreign area officer where he’d have the chance to learn about other people and countries," Fisher said.

Capt. Kyle Wheeler, Company A, 1-4 commander, described Garner as a "quiet professional".

"Knowing Mark for 11 years, I’ve never heard him raise his voice," he said.

Parades said Garner always carried small statue of a Spartan — a reminder of his time at West Point — and an extra dog tag with an inscription asking that it be given to his wife.

"Mark, you led a wonderful life and you are an inspiration to us all," Parades said.

 

 

 

Statement from the family of U.S. Army Capt. Mark Garner, 30, native of State Road, North Carolina and graduate of Elkin High School and the United States Military Academy at West Point. Please feel free to forward this along as needed.


Mark was traveling as a passenger in an M-1151 Humvee with a convoy of U.S. Navy Explosive Ordnance Disposal specialists when his vehicle struck an improvised explosive device killing him and another passenger. Other occupants of the vehicle traveling in southeast Afghanistan were injured. 

We would like to extend our sincere condolences to the families of Mark’s fallen comrades and the families of the sailors who were injured in the attack. Know that we will pray for their speedy recovery. 

Please be praying for the safety of the nearly 200 soldiers in Mark’s company currently fighting this difficult fight as well as dealing with the loss of their company commander.
We pray that they will all return safely to Hohenfels, Germany to be with their families. 

As difficult as this is to accept, it is made easier by the thought that Mark was happy and content as a Soldier. Mark died doing the job he loved, and we will cherish fond memories of him forever. He was a dedicated Soldier, and we are very proud of him.

There are no words to express how much Mark will be missed by his family and friends and the others who had the privilege to know him. His memory will forever remain in our hearts as people share fond stories of Mark, many of which include comments about his larger-than-life smile and depth of character.

 

 
Mark loved his family beyond words, especially his parents, Beth and Don, and his sisters, Jo and Rachel, and often spoke very fondly of his time growing up in the Elkin area. He loved his family, loved his country, loved the Army lifestyle and loved exploring new and exciting places. 

He enjoyed running and spending time with his fellow Soldiers, but the two main things he was wild about were his wife and traveling. When questioned he would say he loved traveling and his wife, and nothing could be better than traveling with his wife, Nickayla.


He visited 52 countries in the last 12 years, places where most people never go, such as Indonesia, China, Bulgaria, Transdiniestria and Albania. Mark loved to drive and explore, so most of his travels were by car. He had his free-time travel planned out for three years in advance, but there just was never enough time for all of his ambitious and exciting travel plans. Although we don’t know anything about his last few minutes, he was probably talking to the soldiers in his convoy about his travels.

 
In Elkin and at all his military assignments, including ranger training, Mark was remembered for his positive attitude and friendly smile. Everyone enjoyed being around Mark, because he was always happy and was the ultimate optimist. Although full of confidence, he blushed easily, especially from Nickayla’s antics, which he loved.

Mark was the commander of Company B, 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment, stationed in Hohenfels, Germany. His unit’s mission in Afghanistan was to support the United Nations International Security Assistance Force as part of
Task Force Zabul under the operational control of the Romanian Army. 

The Soldiers in Mark’s company not only patrolled their area of operations for enemy activity, but also did development work. This included training and mentoring Afghan National Army and Afghan National Police, establishing schools and health clinics, distributing food and farm equipment and helping health care providers treat diseases in adults and children.


Point of Contact: Nickayla Myers-Garner
MarkAndNickaylaGarner@lexercise.com
Email for a telephone interview

 

 

 

 Army Maj. Brian M. Mescall

Died January 09, 2009 serving during Operation Enduring Freedom

33, of Hopkinton, Mass.; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment, Hohenfels, Germany; died Jan. 9 in Jaldak, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when an improvised explosive device detonated near his vehicle. Also killed were Spc. Joseph M. Hernandez and Spc. Jason R. Parsons.

Mass. soldier had ties to NH

EXETER, N.H. — A Massachusetts soldier with ties to New Hampshire was killed in Afghanistan recently when a bomb exploded near his military vehicle.

The Department of Defense said Jan. 12 that Maj. Brian M. Mescall, 33, of Hopkinton, Mass., died Jan. 9 in Zabul province.

He was assigned to 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment, in Hohenfels, Germany.

Keith Tode, a close friend of Mecall’s, said he graduated from Exeter High School in 1993 and moved to Massachusetts with his family following graduation.

Mescall was a 1997 graduate of The Citadel. He was a member of the company F-Troop and graduated with a bachelor of arts degree in history. He also took summer school classes at Framingham State College.

Mescall is survived by his parents, John and Peggy Mescall of Lowell, Mass., his wife, Chiun, and his son, Nathan.

 

 

 

Army Cpl. Joseph M. Hernandez

Died January 09, 2009 serving during Operation Enduring Freedom

24, of Hammond, Ind.; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment, Hohenfels, Germany.; died Jan. 9 in Jaldak, Afghanistan, of wounds sustained when an improvised explosive device detonated near his vehicle. Also killed were Maj. Brian M. Mescall and Spc. Jason R. Parsons.

Soldier loved animals, sons

Joseph M. Hernandez was an animal lover. He once saw a dog fall through a frozen lake, so he jumped in and saved it. At one point, he and his wife shared a two-bedroom apartment with four cats and three dogs.

Hernandez, 24, of Hammond, Ind., died Jan. 9 of wounds suffered when a bomb detonated near his vehicle in Jaldak, Afghanistan. He was assigned to Hohenfels, Germany.

He studied mechanical engineering and biology at Purdue University for two years. In 2002, he surprised his friends and family when he announced he was joining the Army.

“He said it was something he felt he had to do,” said his wife, Alison. “He never had anything bad to say about the military. He just decided to join. He felt it was his duty.”

Hernandez also is survived by his sons, Jacob, 2, and Noah, 9 months.

He enjoyed working on old cars and teaching his older son how to fly mini model airplanes.

When Hernandez was younger, he badly wanted to play piano. The family finally bought one, and he started playing it as it was being carried into the house. His mother asked him how he knew to play, and he said he had been practicing on paper.

 


 

 

Army Sgt. Jason R. Parsons 

 

Army Sgt. Jason R. Parsons

Died January 09, 2009 serving during Operation Enduring Freedom

24, of Lenoir, N.C.; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment, Hohenfels, Germany; died Jan. 9 in Jaldak, Afghanistan, of wounds sustained when an improvised explosive device detonated near his vehicle. Also killed were Maj. Brian M. Mescall and Spc. Joseph M. Hernandez.

Enjoyed traveling Autobahn

Jason R. Parsons, who was obsessed with cars, liked being stationed in Germany because of the Autobahn — a freeway on which people drive at high speeds.

“He liked it because you get to go fast,” said Ken Pritchard, Parsons’ stepdad.

Parsons, 24, of Lenoir, N.C., died Jan. 9 of wounds suffered when a bomb detonated near his vehicle in Jaldak, Afghanistan. He was assigned to Hohenfels, Germany.

High school was when Parsons first actively pursued the military, although he’d been interested in it most of his life.

“He had a great recruiter,” said Brittney Pritchard, Parsons’ sister. “They made you do 20 push-ups to get a T-shirt, and he’d do 80 just to get it. He wanted to prove he was the best.”

An aunt, Brenda Piper, said Parsons was a classic, all-American boy who always smiled from the heart.

“I remember his warm smile and outlook on life,” Piper said. “He didn’t let anything hold him down or hold him back.”

He also is survived by his wife, Ellie, and three stepchildren: Manuel, 12, Jasmine, 11, and Daniel, 5.

“He was a prankster, and so full of life,” said his uncle, Gene Bristol. “We miss him terribly now.”

 

 

 

Army Pfc. Tan Q. Ng

 

Army Pfc. Tan Q. Ngo

Died August 27, 2008 serving during Operation Enduring Freedom

20, of Beaverton, Ore.; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment, Hohenfels, Germany; died Aug. 27 in Kandahar, Afghanistan, when his mounted patrol received small arms and rocket-propelled grenade fire.

Army Pvt. Tan Q. Ngo remembered

One of Tan Q. Ngo’s hobbies was cooking. He could turn anything, even potatoes and eggs, into a meal, as long as it was super spicy, said his brother.

“He could put anything together and make it taste good,” Timmy Ngo said.

Ngo, 20, of Beaverton, Ore., was killed Aug. 27 by small-arms and rocket-propelled-grenade fire in Zabul province. He was a 2006 high school graduate and was assigned to Hohenfels, Germany.

“He wanted to protect his country. He didn’t want another 9/11,” said his mother, Binh Thanh Sam. “He said, ‘This is our home now, I want to take care of it.’”

He walked his younger brothers to school. He volunteered through Key Club at school and spent a year in the Job Corps, working to become a chef and then as a house painter. He also liked video games, including Grand Theft Auto and Halo.

“He always said, ‘Mom, I love you,’” Sam said. “He was a big boy, but a little kid at heart.”

He liked nothing better than playing pickup basketball or football, or playing cards with friends. “He had lots of moms; he was a neighborhood boy,” Sam said.

He also is survived by his father, Ut Quoc Ngo.

 

 
 
Army Cpl. Zachary R. Endsley 

Army Cpl. Zachary R. Endsley

 

2007-07-2321, of Spring, Texas; assigned to 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment, Hohenfels, Germany; died July 23 in Arghendab district, Afghanistan, of wounds sustained when his unit was attacked by enemy forces usingin direct fire.

Burial:
Houston National Cemetery
Houston
Harris County
Texas, USA
Plot: Sec S2 Site 366

 

Army Cpl. Conor G. Masterson 

Army Cpl. Conor G. Masterson

Died April 08, 2007 serving during Operation Enduring Freedom

21, of Woodbury, Minn.; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment, Hohenfels, Germany; died April 8 in eastern Afghanistan of wounds sustained when an improvised explosive device detonated near his vehicle.

Minnesota soldier killed in Afghanistan

MINNEAPOLIS — A soldier from Inver Grove Heights has died of wounds suffered in an attack in Afghanistan, the Defense Department said April 9.

Army Pfc. Conor G. Masterson, 21, died April 7 of wounds he suffered when an improvised explosive device detonated near his vehicle in eastern Afghanistan, the Defense Department said in a news release.

Masterson was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment, based at Hohenfels, Germany.

Further information on the attack was not immediately released. A public affairs officer with the 1st Armored Division in Germany did not immediately return a phone call seeking details.

His death raised number of people with strong Minnesota ties who have died in connection with the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to 57. Masterson was the third killed in Afghanistan.

 

 

 Army Cpl. Isaiah Calloway 

 

Army Cpl. Isaiah Calloway

Died October 30, 2006 serving during Operation Enduring Freedom
23, of Jacksonville, Fla.; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment, Hohenfels, Germany; died Oct. 30 from injuries sustained when his unit came in contact with enemy forces using small arms fire during combat operations in Marah, Afghanistan.

 

Soldier is unit's first to be killed in action since Vietnam War

Seth Robson / S&S
Cpl. Isaiah Calloway, 23, of Jacksonville, Fla., who was killed in action Monday in Afghanistan, is the first combat death for the 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment since the Vietnam War. Calloway was honored Friday at a ceremony in the Hohenfels, Germany, theater.

HOHENFELS, Germany — A 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Division soldier killed in action Monday in Afghanistan was the first combat death suffered by the unit during a year in which groups of its soldiers have been continually downrange in Iraq and Afghanistan, 1-4 commander Lt. Col. Timothy Delass said.

Delass, who spoke Friday at a ceremony in honor of the dead soldier, Cpl. Isaiah Calloway, 23, of Jacksonville, Fla., in the Hohenfels theater, said he was also the first 1-4 soldier to die in battle since the Vietnam War.

Calloway deployed to Afghanistan in June with 1-4’s Company C, which is working alongside Romanian troops fighting Taliban and al-Qaida insurgents in Zabul province, Delass said.

The soldier died when his combat patrol was ambushed by insurgents armed with rocket-propelled grenades and machine guns, Delass said.

“As the platoon maneuvered, he returned fire and during the engagement he was struck by enemy fire. Medics tried to revive him … but he passed away before the medevac could get there,” he said.

Calloway has been recommended for a Bronze Star Medal with a “V” device for his actions, he said.

“The battalion has been deployed for almost more than a year with four separate deployments and this was the first soldier KIA (killed in action) since Vietnam,” Delass said.

The 1-4’s role as the Joint Multinational Readiness Center’s Opposition Force at Hohenfels trains its soldiers well for their overseas missions and is one reason for the low casualty rate, he said.

Other 1-4 troops who spoke at the ceremony remembered Calloway as a quiet soldier and a strong family man. He is survived by his wife, Alecia Denee; daughters, Alexius Michelle, 4; Aleiah Savannah, 3; and son Isaiah Jr., 2.

Staff Sgt. Eric Boyce, who was Calloway’s squad leader before he went to Afghanistan, said the young father seldom came on social trips with the unit because he preferred to spend time with his family.

He was a keen student of the military and hoped to become a noncommissioned officer, said Boyce, 26, of Colorado Springs, Colo.

“At lunch when we were watching television he’d always be outside studying (Army) manuals,” he said.

Physical training was another of Calloway’s strengths, Boyce added.

“He was over 300 (a perfect score) on the Army fitness test every time and he ran two miles in just over 12 minutes,” he said.

The 1-4 chaplain, Maj. Peter Johnson, said Calloway had plans to go to Fort Stewart, Ga., after his tour in Afghanistan and live with his family in nearby Jacksonville, Fla.

“He was going to buy houses, fix them up and sell them,” Johnson said.

Delass said Company C will return from Afghanistan early next year. Another of 1-4’s sub-units is training to deploy when the company gets home, he said.

 

 
 
 
 

View Of The Tomb Of The Unknowns From Section 7-A Of Arlington National Cemetery, Photo By Holly, November 2008

 

 Sentry At The Tomb of the Unknowns: Photo Courtesy of Henry Kass, Captain, United States Air Force, November 2005

 

Photo Courtesy of Andrew V McMaster, May 2006

 

 

 

 


RIP Spc. Omar Soltero

Died January 31, 2011 serving during Operation Enduring Freedom
28, of San Antonio, Texas; assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, Fort Polk, La.; died Jan. 31 in Wardak province, Afghanistan, of wounds sustained when insurgents attacked... his unit using an improvised explosive device
Died January 31, 2011 serving during Operation Enduring Freedom

28, of San Antonio, Texas; assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, Fort Polk, La.; died Jan. 31 in Wardak province, Afghanistan, of wounds sustained when insurgents attacked his unit using an improvised explosive device
 
 
 

 

2006-07-17 34, of Fort Dix, N.J.; assigned to 2nd Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, Fort Polk, La.; died July 17 when his patrol encountered enemy forces using rocket-propelled grenades and mortars in Khwaya Ahmad, Afghanistan.

 

 

 

 

 

 Army Sgt. Robert P. Kassin 

 

2006-07-1629, of Las Vegas; assigned to 2nd Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, Fort Polk, La.; killed July 16 at Larzab Base, Afghanistan, when his platoon encountered enemy forces small-arms fire during combat operations.  Later the 2nd BN. 4th Infantry Regiment Barracks at Fort Polk, LA.  was name in his Honor.

 

Soldier remembered at service 

BY ERIC BUTLER

Globe-News Correspondent LOVIS, N.M. — One speaker at the memorial service of Army Sgt. Robert
Paul Kassin noted how different everything had changed for his loved ones, and many in his community, in the
span of a week. 

Kassin’s friends and family gathered at Highland Baptist Church on Sunday afternoon to pay tribute to the memory of the 29-year-old fallen Army soldier.  Kassin died in Afghanistan a week ago by small-arms fire when his platoon came under attack. 

Kassin’s death brought the fighting in Afghanistan “a little closer to home,” said Ronna Mares, who described Kassin as passionate to his sisters, parents, friends and to his new wife and children.

“I am told it was with that same passion that he embraced the service to his country,” she said. 

Lucia Kassin, Robert’s mother,  noted that her son was apt to bring home what she called strays” — either in the form of new friends or small animals he had found — while growing up. 

“He wanted to take care of more than that. When he died, he died doing what he wanted to do — taking care of home and family, making sure everyone was safe,” she said. “I know when he checked the perimeter, he wanted to protect his buddies there, too.” 

Though Kassin was in the Army, it was his father’s service in the Air Force that brought the family to Eastern New Mexico. Robert Kassin attended junior high and two years of high school in Clovis before he moved to Las Vegas. 

He enlisted in the Army while in Nevada, but his immediate family stayed in Clovis where many remembered Robert Kassin as a person that often utilized his sense of humor to cheer others. 

“He always found a way to make a joke or make you laugh,” Heath Jaquess said. “That was his favorite thing: laughter.” 

“If you were in a bad mood, just like everybody here has said, he was the comic relief,” Eric Williams added during the service. 

New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson has ordered state flags to be flown at half-staff today and Tuesday in honor of Kassin.

Kassin, who married his wife Judy in February, will be buried Saturday in Coushatta, La.

Outside the church, a myriad of supporters, including motorcyclists donned in black leather and various bits of red, white and blue, waited for the end of the service to pay respects to the family.

Inside, Highland Baptist minister Dean Turvaville reflected upon the meaning of Kassin’s death for his survivors. 

“It’s different when you see (war casualties) on TV from when it’s your own son,” Turvaville said. “Until you bury a child, you don’t know. It’s different when hurt has a name.

 

Las Vegan killed in Afghanistan helped build school

Father says son requested second tour of duty

Before he was gunned down this week in a bombed-out region of Afghanistan, Army Sgt. Robert P. Kassin helped build a school where none had ever stood as part of an effort "to make things right," his father said Wednesday.

Kassin was on his second tour of duty in Afghanistan, and "he requested this assignment to go back because the primary mission was to rebuild," his father, Robert Joseph Kassin, said in a telephone interview from Clovis, N.M. That's where his son had spent most of his life before moving to Las Vegas after his junior year of high school.

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The Department of Defense said the 29-year-old soldier was killed Sunday at Larzab Base, Afghanistan when enemy forces attacked his platoon with small arms fire during combat operations.

Kassin was assigned to Charlie Company of the 2nd "Warrior" Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team of the 10th Mountain Division out of Fort Polk, La.

"They created a school for an area that never had a school before. He was actually very proud to be over there doing that. ... He was very proud of his military service. He tried to make things right," the elder Kassin said.

He said his son had listed Las Vegas as his home of record because that's where he joined the Army in 1996, the year after he came to Las Vegas to help his uncle, the late Paul Knowlden, with a television repair business. Knowlden suffered from a partially blinding eye disease and needed his nephew to pick up and deliver TVs.

In the fall of 1995, Kassin had waited too long to finish his senior year at a public high school. Instead, he attended a special private school to graduate, his father said.

"I was still in the Air Force at the time," said Robert Joseph Kassin, a retired avionics technician. "He decided in his senior year to enlist in the military and went into the Army. I told him I would stand by any decisions he made."

By the time he was killed, his son was on his third enlistment and second tour of Afghanistan, having served there at the onset of the invasion in the aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

He had returned to Clovis in December when his mother was hospitalized and the family last spoke to him when his grandfather died in March.

"We sent a Red Cross message to him and two days later he was able to contact us but was unable to make the funeral. When we talked to him at that time, he expressed wishes that he be buried in Louisiana close to his grandfather," the elder Kassin said.

He said his son "liked video games and music. We worked on cars together. ... He liked taking care of people. He liked being a leader and being the center of attention. He liked to keep people happy and take care of them," he said.

Robert Paul Kassin was born Jan. 22, 1977, in Flint, Mich. After moves dictated by his father's Air Force career, the family eventually settled in Clovis, N.M., where Cannon Air Force Base is located.

At 19, Kassin left Las Vegas in 1996 for the Army and was later stationed in Germany where he met his first wife, Carey Kassin, who also was a soldier. They were married in 1998 and a year later, their son, Joseph Dakota Kassin, was born.

"He was a very good man and a very dedicated soldier. I'm very proud of him," Carey Kassin said from Petal, Miss., where she lives with their 6-year-old son.

"I see him every day, every time I look at our son. He (Joseph) told me every day, 'I'm so proud of my dad,'" she said.

They were divorced in December, and Robert P. Kassin married Judy Kassin, of Alabama, in February.

Sgt. Kassin will be buried near his grandfather, Aron Wilson, following a memorial service July 29 in Coushatta, La.

 

 

 

 

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