FOURTH U.S. INFANTRY REGIMENT: HOME of HEROES

4th Infantry, 4th Infantry Regiment, Warrior Battalion 1/4, INF 2/4 INF, 3/4 INF,

4th United States Infantry Regiment

The 4th United States Infantry Regiment lost 2 officers and 58 enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 officer and 61 enlisted men to disease during the Civil War.

It is honored by a monnument at Gettysburg.

The monument to the Fourth United States Infantry Regiment is south of Gettysburg on Ayers Avenue. (39.794939° N, 77.240879° W;

Army of the Potomac
Fifth Corps
Second Division,
First Brigade
Fourth U.S. Infantry
Four Companies.
Captain Julius W. Adams, Jr. commanding

July 2 Arrived in the morning and took position near the line of the Twelfth Corps. The Regiment with the Brigade moved from the right to the left of the line and at 5 p.m. advanced across Plum Run near Little Round Top and supported the Second Brigade in its advance to the crest of the rocky wooded hill beyond and facing to the left engaged the Confederates but returned under a heavy fire on both flanks and from the rear after the Confederates had gained a position in the Wheatfield in the rear of the Brigade.

July 3 Remained in the same position.

July 4 The Regiment with the Brigade made a reconnaissance and developed a force of the Confederate Infantry and Artillery in front and engaged on the skirmish line well to the front.

Casualties: killed 10 men, wounded 2 officers and 23 men.

This is information is courtesy of http://www.civilwarintheeast.com/USA/US/US04.php

 

 1861 
JanuaryStationed at ten different posts on the Pacific slope from Puget Sound to the Gulf of California. Ordered to concentrate at Camp Sumner, San Francisco for movement to Washington, D.C. and duty in the Defenses of that city. Five junior officers resigned to enter Confederate service.
 1862 
MarchAttached to Sykes' Regular Infantry (Reserve) Brigade, Army of the Potomac and moved to Virginia Peninsula
April 5-May 4Siege of Yorktown, Va.
MayAttached to 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 5th Army Corps, Army Potomac
June 25-July 1Seven days before Richmond

June 26

Battle of Mechanicsville

June 27

Gaines' Mill
June 29 Savage Station

The train conveying the regimental records, baggage and supplies, was burned to prevent its falling into the hands of the enemy. For nearly a week, officers and men had to eat and shelter themselves what they could forage.

June 30Turkey Bridge

The regiment was the last to cross the already partly destroyed "Grapevine Bridge."

July 1

Malvern Hill
JulyAt Harrison's Landing
August 16-28Movement to Fortress Monroe, then to Centerville
August 28-September 2Pope's Campaign in Northern Virginia
August 29

Battle of Groveton

August 30 Bull Run

September 6-22

Maryland Campaign
September 16-17

Battle of Antietam

September 19-20Shepherdstown Ford
OctoberAt Sharpsburg
October 16-17Kearneysville and Shepherdstown
October 29-November 19

Movement to Falmouth, Va.

December 12-15

Battle of Fredericksburg, Va.

1863 
January 20-24"Mud March"
April 27-May 6Chancellorsville Campaign
May 1-5Battle of Chancellorsville
June 11-July 24Gettysburg Campaign
July 1-3Battle of Gettysburg

But five companies with 173 enlisted men were present

July 5-24Pursuit of Lee
August 15Moved to New York and attached to Dept. of the East for duty supression draft riots. Stationed for three weeks in Washington Square.
SeptemberMoved to Forts Tompkins and Wood
1864 
April 25ReJoined Army Potomac, attached to 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 9th Army Corps
May 4-June 12Rapidan Campaign
May 5-7Battle of the Wilderness
May 8-21Spotsylvania Court House
May 10Ny River
May 22-26North Anna River
May 26-28On line of the Pamunkey
May 28-31Totopotomoy
JuneAttached to 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 5th Army Corps
June 1-12Cold Harbor
June 1-3Bethesda Church
June 16-18Before Petersburg
June 22Ordered to City Point, Va. and assigned to Headquarters, Army Potomac, numbering only 134 men fit for duty
1865 
April 2Fall of Petersburg
MayProvost Duty at Richmond, Va. attached to Dept. of Virginia
July 15Moved to N.Y. Harbor. A detachment with a number of officers was sent to West Point conveying the colors of the regiment, including some that had been carried in the Mexican War. The Corps of Cadets was paraded and joined the escort of the tattered and shot ripped flags to the Post Chapel where they were finally deposited.

 

HISTORY OF THE FOURTH U.S. INFANTRY 1861-1865

 National Colors flown by Regiment Re-enactors Co H 4th U.S. Infantry.

Record of the Fourth Infantry.—The following are the battles in which the Fourth United States Infantry participated during the Rebellion, and names of officers serving with the Regiment, in each engagement:

April 1862 - Siege of Yorktown. —Lieutenant-colonel R. C. Buchanan, commanding Regiment; Captain L. C. Hunt Acting field-officer; Cap­tains J. B. Collins, Hiram Dryer, F. H. Bates, R. N. Scott, T. E. Turner; First Lieutenants C. H. Carlton, A, R. Benedict, Thomas A. Martin, A. B. Cain, Alexander Carolin, W. S. Collier, John L. Buell, Regimental-quartermaster: Sec­ond Lieutenants A. E. Sheldon, R. P. McKibbin, William H. Powell, Adjutant, G. M. Ran­dall, H. W. Patterson, E. F. Brenner, S. G. Krepps, S. T. Crowley.

June, 1862—Gaines' Mills. - Captain J. B. Col­lins, commanding Regiment; Captain Hiram Dryer, Acting field-officer; Captain T E. Tur­ner; First Lieutenants C. H. Carlton, J. W. Adams, A. R. Benedict, Thomas A. Martin, A. B. Cain, Alexander Carolin, W. S. Collier, John L. Buell, Regimental-quarter master; Second Lieutenants A. E. Sheldon, .R P. McKibbin, William H. Powell, Adjutant, G. M. Randall, H. W. Patterson, E. F. Brenner, S. G. Krepps, S. T. Crowley.

July, 1862—Malvern Hill.—Captain J. B. Collins, commanding Regiment; Captain Hiram Dryer, Acting field-officer; Captain T. E. Tur­ner ; First Lieutenants C. H. Carlton, A. R. Benedict, Thomas A, Martin, A. B. Cain, Alex­ander Chrolin, W. S. Collier, John L. Buell, Regimental-quartermaster; Second Lieutenants A. E. Sheldon, R P. McKibbin, William H.
Powell, Adjutant, G. M Randall, H. W. Pat­terson, E. E. Brenner, S. T. Crowley, S. G.
Krepps.

August, 1862—Bull Run, No. 2.—Captain J. B. Collins, commanding Regiment; Captain
Hiram Dryer, Acting field-officer First Lieuten­ants C. H. Carlton, A. R. Benedict, Thomas A. Martin, A. B. Cain, Alexander Carolin, W. 8. Collier, John L. Buell; Second Lieutenants A. E. Sheldon, R. P. McKibbin, G. M. Randall, H. W. Patterson, Acting adjutant. 8. T. Crow­ley, S. G. Krepps, George Williams, E. F. Bren­ner, Regimental-quartermaster.

September, 1862—Antietam,—Captain Hiram Dryer, commanding Regiment; Captain C. H. Carlton, Acting field-officer; First Lieutenants A. R. Benedict, Thomas A. Martin, A. B. Cain, Alexander Carolin, John L. Buell, A. E. Shel­don ; Second Lieutenants H. P. McKibbin, G. M. Randall, H. W, Patterson, S. T. Crowley, George Williams, E. F. Brenner, Regimental-quartermaster,

December, 1862—Fredericksburg. — Captain Hiram Dryer, commanding Regiment; Captain J. W. Adams, Acting field-officer ; First Lieute­nants A. R. Benedict, Thomas A. Martin, Alex­ander Carolin, W. S. Collier, Ira F. Gensel; Second Lieutenants G. M. Randall, acting Ad­jutant, H. W. Patterson, Regimental-quarter­master, 8. T. Crowley, George Williams.

May, 1863-Chancellorsvllle.—Captain Hiram Dryer, commanding Regiment; Captain J. W. Adams, acting Field-officer : First Lieutenants Thomas A. Martin. A. B. Cain, Alexander Caro­lin, W. S. Collier, A. E Sheldon, H. W. Patter­son ; Second Lieutenants S. T. Crowley, George Williams. John Miller, G. L. Luhn, G. W. Dost, George Atcheson, J. J. S. Hassler, John Simmons, Adjutant,

July, 1863—Gettysburg.—Captain J. W. Adams, commanding Regiment; First Lieuten­ant, A. R. Benedict, Acting field officer; First Lieutenants Thomas A. Martin, Alexander Car­olin, W. S. Collier, A. E, Sheldon, H. W. Pat­terson, S. T. Crowley ; Second Lieutenants John Miller, G. W. Dost, G. L. Luhn, George Atcheson, George Williams, John Simmons, Ad­jutant.

May, 1864— Wilderness.—Captain C. H. Brightly, commanding Regiment ; Captain Thomas A. Martin; First Lieutenants—G. M. Randall, S. T. Crowley; Second Lieutenants George Atcheson, John Simmons. Adjutant.

May, 1864-Spottsylvania.—Captain A. B. Cain, commanding Regiment; First Lieutenant R. P. McKibbin, Acting field-officer; First Lieu­tenant S. T. Crowley, Second Lieutenant George Atcheson, Acting-adjutant.

May, 1864—Spotsylvania Court-house.—Cap­tain A. B. Cain, commanding Regiment; First Lieutenant R. P. McKibbin, Acting field-officer ; First Lieutenant S. T. Crowley ; Second Lieuten­ant George Atcheson, Acting adjutant.

May, 1864—North Anna River.—Captain A. B. Cain, commanding Regiment; First Lieuten­ant, S. T. Crowley, Acting field-officer ; Second Lieutenants G. L. Luhn, George Atcheson, Act­ing Adjutant.

June, 1864—Coal Harbor.—Captain A. B. Cain, commanding Regiment; First Lieutenant, 8. T. Crowley, Acting field officer ; Second Lieu­tenant, G. L. Luhn, acting Adjutant.

The Companies were commanded by non-com­missioned officers.

June, 1864—Petersburg.—Captain A. B. Cain, commanding Regiment,; Captain A. Carolin; First Lieutenant, J. J. S. Hassler; Second Lieu­tenants John R. Bothwell, Whittinghnm Cox, Acting Adjutant; First Lieutenant, H. W. Pat­terson, Second Lieutenant, G. L. Luhn.

April, 1865— Lee's Surrender, Appomattox Court-house.—Captain J. B. Collins, command­ing Regiment; Captain A. B. Cain, Acting field-officer ; Captains Alexander Carolin, A. E. Sheldon ; First Lieutenants R. P. McKibbin, W. H. Powell, G. L. Luhn, J. J. S. Hassler. George Atcheson ; Second Lieutenants T. F. Quinn, John R Bothwell, Whittingham Cox.

The following-named officers of the Fourth United States Infantry were detached from the Regiment;

Colonel Silas Casey, Major-general Volunteers; Lieutenant-colonel R. C. Buchanan, command­ing Firat Brigade, Regular Infantry ; Major S. G. Simmons, Colonel Volunteers; Major H. M. Judah, Brigadier-general Volunteers; Major F.T. Dent, Brigadier-general Volunteers; Captain D. A. Russell, Brigadier-general Volunteers; Cap­tain Maurice Maloney, Colonel Volunteers ; Cap­tain L. C. Hunt, Brigadier-general Volunteers; Captain George Crook, Brigadier-general Volun­teers; Captain R. N. Scott, Aide-de-Camp to General Halleck ; Captain C. H. Carlton, Colon­el Volunteers; Captain R. P. McKibbin. Aide-de-Camp to General Crittenden; Captain William H. Powell, Assistant Adjutant general, First Brigade, Regular Infantry; Captain George M. Randall, Lieutenant colonel Volunteers.—Army and Navy Journal.

(History Magazine 1897)

Honor Roll 1861 to 1865

 Fourth Infantry Position Marker at Plumb Ridge, Gettysburg Battlefield List of men from the regiment who were killed in action, died of wounds or disease. The list is incomplete.

 

1. Abel, C.

2. Allums,

3. Alrice

4. Aschmann, E.

5. Banrall, (Andersonville Prison, Ga.)

6. Barrington, Peter (Gettysburg, Pa.)

7. Becker, William (Gettysburg, Pa.)

8. Begnell, Mathew (Andersonville Prison, Ga.)

9. Bemmer, William

10. Berghauser, August (Antietam,Md.)

11. Bowers, John (Andersonville Prison, Ga.)

12. Boyd, L. (Andersonville Prison, Ga.)

13. Boyer, John (Andersonville Prison, Ga.)

14. Boynten, Henry

15. Brady, Barnard

16. Brailey,

17. Brophy, James

18. Burr, J.L

19. Bauman, Louis (Yorktown, Va.)

20. Carolin, Alexander 2nd Lt. (Petersburg, VA.)

21. Casey, Richard (Antietam,Md.)

22. Carnahan, Lorenzo

23. Caldwell,

24. Christiansen, Edward (2nd Manassas, Va.)

25. Clark, Josiah

26. Clark, Mich

27. Connell, Possibly “Dennis” (Andersonville Prison, Ga.)

28. Demus, V.

29. Doile,

30. Donegan, John

31. Dougharty,

32. Drumming, (Spotsylvania Courthouse, Va.)

33. Dows, James

34. Engers, Christian (Gettysburg, Pa.)

35. Darling

36. Fiedler, Theodore

37. Flannery, John

38. Forcer, David

39. Foster, James (Andersonville Prison, Ga.)

40. Fox, Charles (Mine Run, Va.)

41. Gromley, J.

42. Grainer, Henry (Wilderness, Va.)

43. Granen,

44. Gulvere, David (Andersonville Prison, Ga.)

45. Hopkins, Curley

46. Kay, Robert (Andersonville Prison, Ga.)

47. Keapers, William

48. Kehear, John (Spotsylvania Courthouse, Va.)

49. Kelley, David (Andersonville Prison, Ga.)

50. Lomaire, George

51. Mannix,

52. Mare,W. (Gettysburg, Pa.)

53. Mayfield, Benjamin

54. McCarry, Mitch

55. McCoy, George (Andersonville Prison, Ga.)

56. McCue, James (Spotsylvania Courthouse, Va.)

57. McDonald, James

58. McDonald, Roger (Gettysburg, Pa.)

59. McDonald, (Andersonville Prison, Ga.)

60. McGinley, David

61. McGoom,

62. McGuire, Samuel (Antietam, Md.)

63. McManimus, Peter (Gettysburg, Pa.)

64. McPhail, H.

65. McSim, Edward

66. Moran, John (Andersonville Prison, Ga.)

67. Morrisson, (Gettysburg, Pa.) could be either Robert or Joseph “Morrison”

68. Masterson, Patrick

69. Northrup, Lucius G. (Andersonville Prison, Ga.)

70. Patterson, John

71. Power, Paterik

72. Restell, German (Petersburg, Va.)

73. Riley, John (Gettysburg, Pa.)

74. Rice, James (Gettysburg, Pa.)

75. Robbins,

76. Robinson, Peter (Gettysburg, Pa.)

77. Rogerson,

78. Rourk, John (Antietam,Md.)

79. Simpson, Edward (Mine Run, Va.)

80. Smith, Aaron (Andersonville Prison, Ga.)

81. Sullivan, James

82. Thompson, William (Spotsylvania Courthouse, Va.)

83. Vamlock, James

84. Welch, Nathanial

85. Welsh, James (Spotsylvania Courthouse, Va.)

86. Williams, John (Andersonville Prison, Ga.)

Copyright 2003 by P.W. Logan

Civil War

1st Battalion 4th Infantry Regiment

Campaign Participation Credit

*Peninsula, *Manassas, *Antietam, *Fredericksburg, *Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, *Wilderness, *Spotsylvania, *Cold Harbor, *Petersburg, *Appomattox, *Virginia 1863

2nd Battalion 4th Infantry Regiment

Campaign Participation Credit

*Peninsula, *Manassas, *Antietam, *Fredericksburg, *Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Appomattox, Virginia 1863

3rd Battalion 4th Infantry Regiment 

Campaign Participation Credit

*Peninsula, *Manassas, *Antietam, *Fredericksburg, *Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, *Wilderness, *Spotsylvania, *Cold Harbor, *Petersburg, *Appomattox, *Virginia 1863

In 1861 with the secession of a number of Southern states to form the new Confederation States of America, the regiment moved from its dispersed posts in the Department of the Pacific to Southern California to suppress any secessionist uprising. Charged with the supervision of Los Angeles, San Bernadino, San Diego, and Santa Barbara Counties, on 14 August 1861, Major William Scott Ketchum made a rapid march on 26 August and encamped near San Bernadino, California with Companies D and G, later reinforced at the beginning of September by a detachment of ninety First U.S. Dragoons and a howitzer. Except for frequent sniping at his camp, this move stifled a secessionist uprising and prevented secessionist political demonstrations during the September California gubernatorial elections in San Bernardino County.

In late October 1861 the regiment was relieved by California volunteer units and marched to San Pedro harbor where they waited for the balance of the regiment to gather before being transported to Washington D.C. to become part of the garrison in defense of the capital. The regiment was organized with other Regular Army units in the Volunteer Army as the First Brigade of George Sykes's "Regular Division" of the V Corps. The regiment's first Civil War engagement was in April and May 1862 during the Siege of Yorktown. By quick action at the Battle of Gaines Mill in June 1862, the Regulars saved Wood's and Tidball's artillery batteries from capture by Confederate infantry.

It participated as a part of the Army of the Potomac in the Second Battle of Bull Run and then the subsequent Maryland Campaign. At the Battle of Antietam, the regulars held the Middle Bridge over Antietam Creek, guarding the vital passage. They advanced towards the Confederate-held town of Sharpsburg, Maryland, late in the afternoon of 17 September 1862, before being recalled to their lines.

After seeing limited action at the Battle of Fredricksburg in December 1862, the regiment went into winter camp and saw no further combat for months. It formed part of Joseph Hooker's rear guard at Chancellorsville. Throughout the Gettysburg Campaign, the regiment served in the Regular Division under its newly promoted commander, Romeryn A. Ayers. During the Battle of Gettysburg, it was part of the fighting on the Second Day, helping push back Confederate infantry near Devil's Den and the Wheatfield.

Heavily depleted by battle casualties, the much-reduced regiment nevertheless continued to participate in the major campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, by 1864 under the command of Ulysses S. Grant during the Overland Campaign. The remaining men participated in the battles of Wilderness, Spotsylvania Courthouse, Cold Harbor, and the Siege of Petersburg. By the time the regiment manned the breastworks around Petersburg, a lieutenant, George Randall, was in command as the senior officer still present for duty.

On 22 June 1864, with less than 150 men left, the 4th Infantry reported to City Point, Virginia, to become Gen. Ulysses S. Grant’s headquarters guard. The greatly reduced regiment was present at Appomattox Courthouse for Robert E. Lee's surrender. Grant, then commanding the armies of the Union, never forgot the 4th Infantry, with which he had served as a lieutenant in Mexico and on the frontier. As recognition of its valor during the Civil War, he designated it as the guard unit during the formal surrender ceremony.

Survivors of the 4th U.S. Infantry marched in the grand review of troops in Washington D.C. in May 1865, immediately following the war.

Numbers 140. Report of Lieutenant Colonel Robert C. Buchanan, Fourth U. S. Infantry, commanding First Brigade, of the battle of Gaines' Mill, engagement at Turkey Bridge, and battle of Malvern Hill.

HDQRS. FIRST BRIGADE, REGULAR INFANTRY, Camp near Harrison's Landing, Va., July 6, 1862. OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 11, Part 2 (Peninsular Campaign)

SIR: In obedience to instructions from division headquarters I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of my brigade since the 26th of June:

On the 26th, the brigade, consisting of the Third, Fourth, Twelfth, and Fourteenth Infantry, having just returned to camp near New Bridge from a reconnaissance to Totopotomoy Creek, was ordered out about 4 p.m. in the direction of Mechanicsville to support McCall's division, then known to be engaged with the enemy. We advanced about half a mile, and bivouacked for the night in order of battle. At daylight morning we moved back to camp, and after collecting the knapsacks of the men, sending off the sick to across the Chickahominy, and destroying the commissary and other stores, crossed the creek at Gaines' Mill to a position in front of McGehee's house, and covering the Cold Harbor Cross Roads, where it was disposed of in order to repel an attack of the enemy. I ordered the Fourth Infantry to support Weed's battery, posted on a knoll commanding the Cold Harbor road, whilst the Third was ordered to occupy a position along the head of the road and to the left of the battery, from which it could observe the road and a skirt of timber in front, through which the enemy might advance. The Twelfth and Fourteenth were drawn up in line in the corn field in front of McGehee's house. This disposition of my brigade was generally maintained throughout the battle, being only varied by the alternate successes of the opposing forces during the action, as the troops pressed back the enemy or were pressed back in turn. Our position was the extreme right of the line, and upon its being held very much depended.

About noon the enemy commenced by attacking our right flank with his artillery, to which Weed responded in a vigorous manner, soon silencing his battery and driving him from that part of the field. Tidball's battery was now advanced and took up a position on the right of Weed, and both retained their positions till the close of the battle. The action soon became lively on the right, and the Fourteenth Infantry was first thrown into the edge of the woods fronting the house, through which the enemy's skirmishers soon attempted to advance, but without success, as the Fourteenth routed and drove them off handsomely. Meantime they came up in force through the woods and field to the left, and immediately Major Clitz changed the front of his battalion (the Twelfth) and repulsed them handsomely. Again the enemy brought up his artillery and engaged Weed and Tidball, but was repulsed, with the loss of several caissons blown up.

About 3.30 p.m. the enemy renewed his efforts, and the action soon became general throughout the entire extent of the lines. At this time the brigade was disposed as follows: The Fourth, still on the extreme right, was supporting Weed and Tidball; the Third in its position observing the road; the Twelfth along the fence running to the edge of the woods fronting the house, and the Fourteenth in the corn field facing toward this woods.

Seeing a considerable force of the enemy coming up from the ravine to the left, and moving up through the field to the left of that occupied by the Twelfth and Fourteenth, I directed the Fourteenth to change front to the rear, with the view of flanking him, and then to charge as he fell back. This was done, and the two battalions crossed the intervening fence and advanced in as handsome a line of battle as I ever saw on drill, driving the enemy from this field and killing many of them. I then advanced the Third into the field on the right and threw it into the edge of the wood in front, in order to repel any effort to turn my right. Having done this, I observed a company of pickets coming up from the Cold Harbor road without an officer, and upon inquiring whose, it was found that it was Captain Lay's Twelfth Infantry, who, the sergeant stated, had been taken sick and was then with the Fourth Infantry. This officer has since been arrested under charges for gross dereliction of duty on a subsequent occasion.

The battle now raged with varying success until night-fall, when all the troops were withdrawn from the field and the most of them were thrown across the Chickahominy. The conflict in this part of the field throughout the entire day was characterized by the most indomitable energy, perseverance, and gallantry of our troops. Every time that a regiment of the enemy was repulsed a fresh body came to take its place, whilst we occupied our original ground with the same forces that first went into action. Here it was that we met with the most of our loss, and yet my brigade maintained its ground against greatly superior odds for nearly eight hours.

During the entire action the Fourth Infantry, under command of Captain J. B. Collins, covered the two batteries, and at its close formed in rear of them and marched there, when they were withdrawn, about 8 p.m. On the march to the rear, which was not commenced until the batteries were nearly out of ammunition, the Fourth on three several occasions formed, fronting the enemy and checking his advance, whilst the batteries were enabled to pass successfully obstacles that seriously impended their progress and threatened their capture. This regiment did not cross the Chickahominy, but took up a position covering the Grapevine Bridge on the north side, which it maintained that night. The next morning, after partially destroying that bridge, it crossed by the Woodbury Bridge to Camp Lincoln. Major Delozier Davidson commanded the regiment until after it was posted as the support to the batteries, when without giving notice of this intention to any one, he absented himself, leaving his horse with his orderly, and has not been seen or heard of since.

Our loss was very severe, and among others was that of the brave and lamented Major Rossell, commanding the Third Infantry, and the gallant and dashing Clitz, commanding the Twelfth, who was twice severely wounded, and is now supposed to be a prisoner in Richmond. My command behaved admirably, and fully maintained the reputation of the regulars. The two old regiments (the Third and Fourth) maintained their previous reputation, and the new battalions (the Twelfth and Fourteenth) earned one for themselves. In the latter part of the evening acting assistant adjutant-general, Captain R. N. Scott, Fourth Infantry, was disabled by a severe wound in the arm whilst in the act of carrying an order to the batteries and the Fourth to withdraw, and was soon compelled to leave the field. His cool and gallant conduct throughout the day deserves especial notice.

On the 28th the Fourth Infantry was thrown out on picket in front of Grapevine Bridge, with orders to destroy it, which was successfully done, and about noon the regiment was relieved by mounted pickets and returned to Camp Lincoln. About 3 p.m. the brigade left camp and moved past Savage Station in the direction of White Oak Swamp, through which it passed that night and the next morning, when it was halted near the head of the Quarker road and placed in position for battle. This position was occupied until the morning of the 30th, when the brigade moved to Malvern Hills, near the James River. Here the brigade was divided, the Twelfth and Fourteenth occupying a position on the plain near the house, whilst the Third and Fourth were posted in a wood on the side of a hill to the right of the line and somewhat in advance, which it was considered it was most important to hold. That evening the enemy opened fire from a battery on the opposite side of the plain at the foot of the hill, and after a sharp artillery fight was obliged to retire, leaving his pieces behind him. During the fight a New York battery (said to be Captain Smith's), firing through the woods in which the Third was posted, killed, by cutting away the branches of the trees, which fell upon them, 1 officer, Lieutenant McGuire, 1 sergeant, and 1 private of that regiment.

On the 1st of July the enemy attacked the position occupied by the army in force, and about 3.30 p.m. the First Brigade was brought into action, the disposition of the regiments being regulated by the division commander. The Third and Fourth were pushed across a ravine through the woods to our right, whilst the Twelfth and Fourteenth were deployed on the plain at the foot of the hills on a line about perpendicular to the direction of their base. By this latter movement the enemy was defeated in an effort to turn our flank, and the brigade was reunited and placed in position in the extreme front by the brigadier-general commanding, which position it held until about 2 a.m., when I withdraw it a few yards to another` on the road to the house where the left lay. About that hour I received an order from the commander of the Fifth Provisional Army Corps to the effect that my brigade, with a battery of artillery and Averell's cavalry, would constitute the rear guard of the army, which was then falling back across Turkey Creek Bridge.

The brigade remained in its position until about 5 a.m., when Colonel Averell arrived on the ground and directed its further disposition. Having about 7 a.m. received the order to retire, the brigade moved off, left in front, and having crossed the bridge, was formed in a large plain-the Third, Fourth, and Twelfth in line of battle, and the Fourteenth to the left and front on the main road, covering some roads leading into White Oak Swamp, which position it maintained for some time; but no enemy appearing to oppose us, the march was resumed and continued to the camp near Harrison's Landing, about half a mile from this point. On the 3rd we changed our camp to our present position.

In summing up our operations I cannot but ask for my brigade the favorable notice of the commanding general for its patient endurance of hardship and great exposure, its energetic and prompt action on all occasions, and its marked coolness and gallantry in action. Bivouacking for eleven nights with small supply of rations, which it had seldom time to cook; enduring everything, not only without complaint, but with absolute cheerfulness; conscious of the justice of the cause in which we are enlisted, it has earned for itself an honorable name.

Major Delozier Davidson, Fourth Infantry, absented himself from his regiment at the commencement of the action of the 27th and has not been heard of since: First Lieutenant J. B. Williams, Third Infantry, absented himself also on that occasion and has not since joined; Captain J. Carbery Lay, Twelfth Infantry, is reported as having been drunk during the evening of the 1st of July and unfit for duty, and Second Lieutenant Thomas S. Wright, Fourteenth Infantry, absented himself without leave during that evening and has not since joined.

It now becomes my agreeable duty to bring to the especial notice of the commanding general the names of the following officers, whose gallant conduct entitles them to that distinction: Captain R. N. Scott, Fourth Infantry, acting assistant adjutant-general of the First Brigade on the 27th June (severely wounded); Second Lieutenant William H. Powell, adjutant Fourth Infantry, acting assistant adjutant-general since that date; Captain J. B. Collins, commanding Fourth Infantry; Captain Hiram Dryer, acting field officer Fourth Infantry; Captain J. D. O'Connell, commanding Fourteenth Infantry; Bvt. Major M. M. Blunt, commanding Twelfth Infantry; Captain D. B. McKibbin, acting field officer Fourteenth Infantry; Captain Thomas W. Walker, acting field officer Third Infantry; Captain John G. Read, acting field officer Twelfth Infantry; Captain Frederick Winthrop, Twelfth Infantry; First Lieuts. C. R. Coster, H. E. Smith, J. G. Heckscher, and Robert L. Burnett, Twelfth Infantry.

Inclosed are the reports of the regimental commanders.

Believing that my report covers all the principal operations of my brigade, I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

ROBT. C. BUCHANAN, Lieutenant-Colonel, Fourth Infantry, Commanding Brigade.

Captain FRED T. LOCKE, Asst. Adjt. General, Fifth Provisional Army Corps.

No. 143. Report of Captain Joseph B. Collins, Fourth U. S. Infantry, of the battle of Gaines' Mill, engagement at Turkey Bridge, and battle of Malvern Hill.

CAMP NEAR JAMES RIVER, VA.,

July 4, 1862.

SIR: I have the honor to make the following report relative to the operations of the Fourth U. S. Infantry since June 25, 1862:

The regiment left camp near Gaines' Mill and New Bridge, Va., on the 25th June, and marched in the direction of the Old Church, at the Totopotomoy Creek, bivouacked until next day, and returned to camp about 7 a.m. Struck our camp near Gaines' Mill and New Bridge on the afternoon of the 26th; sent the baggage to Camp Lincoln, and moved out in the direction of Mechanicsville, formed line of battle, and remained in line all night.

On the morning of the 27th crossed the creek at Gaines' Mill and took up a position for battle near the mill to support Weed's battery, which was afterward re-enforced by Tidball's. The enemy vigorously attacked our position with artillery between 11 and 12 o'clock a.m. As soon as the enemy opened fire Major D. Davidson, commanding the regiment, left the field, saying he was going for re-enforcements. He returned shortly afterward, and directed me to move the regiment by flank to the right about its length. He then almost immediately retired to the rear without informing any one of his intentions, and has not been heard of since. He left his horse on the field with hid orderly. As soon as I became satisfied that Major Davidson had abandoned his regiment I assumed command, and moved its position to one which it retained until sunset. The regiment was, with but slight intermission, under fire of the enemy's artillery from 12 o'clock until dark. They made three attempts in force to drive Captains Weed's and Tidball's batteries from their positions, but were repulsed with great slaughter. At dusk the firing and cheering on our left induced me to believe our troops were retiring, and the captains of the batteries saying they were nearly out of ammunition and about to retire, I at once threw the regiment on their left, between them and their enemy, keeping in their rear, while they withdrew in excellent order, exposing my right and front to the enemy's fire. After the batteries retired, seeing none of our troops on the field to our left except a few stragglers, I slowly followed the batteries in excellent order, under a fire of artillery and musketry, carrying off our wounded, having previously buried our few dead on the field. Bivouacked on the east side of the Chickahominy, covering Grapevine Bridge.

On the morning of the 27th I found Lieutenant John Whitney, Third Infantry, with his company on picket on my right and front. He was doing such excellent service that I directed him to remain there, and only had him recalled after the batteries withdrew. He was very efficient. Lieutenant J. A. Duvillard, Twelfth Infantry, also reported to me with a few men, having been separated from his picket. He remained with me until the next morning.

At sunrise on the 28th marched to Woodbury's Bridge (Grapevine Bridge having been partially destroyed) and crossed to Camp Lincoln- the last regiment to cross the Chickahominy River. At 10 a.m. the regiment was placed on picket on the west side of the rear, near Grapevine Bridge, which they fired and completely destroyed. Was relieved during the afternoon by cavalry pickets. At sunset left Camp Lincoln, marched all night, passing through Savage Station and White Oak Swamp, and halted at the head of Quarker road at 8 a.m. the 29th. Bivouacked in line of battle until the morning of the 30th, then moved to Malvern, near James River, where the regiment was placed in line of battle.

On the 1st of July the enemy attacked in force. The regiment having been ordered to advance with General Butterfield's brigade and to use the bayonet, about dark on the 1st of July one of our batteries fired two rounds of canister on my rear and not more than 200 yards from me, which killed and wounded some of my men. Fortunately we were lying down at the time or the loss would have been very severe.

The regiment was one of the four regular regiments forming the First Brigade of Regulars, commanded by Lieutenant Colonel R. C. Buchanan, that slept on the battle-field in advance of the line of the battle formed by our troops in the morning. The morning of the 2nd of July the regiment formed the rear of the rear guard until we left the field of battle. Camped that night near Harrison's Landing, on the James River. On the morning of the 3rd marched one mile to our present camp.

The list killed, wounded, and missing accompanies this.* During the entire operations the officers and men behaved with exemplary coolness, and carried out all my orders most cheerfully, promptly, and to my entire satisfaction.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOS. B. COLLINS,

Captain, Fourth Infantry, Commanding Regiment.

Lieutenant WILIAM H. POWELL,

Adjt. Fourth Inft., Actg. Asst. Adjt. General, First Brigadier Regulars.

Numbers 102. Report of Lieutenant Colonel Robert C. Buchanan, Fourth U. S. Infantry, commanding First Brigade, of the battle of Bull Run.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST BRIGADE, REGULAR INFANTRY, Camp near Hall's Hill, Va., September 6, 1862.

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of my brigade, composed of the Third, Fourth, and First Battalions of the Twelfth, and First and Second Battalions of the Fourteenth Infantry, on the 30th ultimo, at Bull Run and in its vicinity:

At daylight on the morning of the 30th we took up our line of march

from our bivouac on the Manassas and Gainesville road in the direction of Bull Run and reached that stream about 10 a. m., soon after which I was ordered to place my brigade in position in the field fronting the Dogan house. The First and Second Battalions of the Fourteenth were deployed in a corn field, with the Twelfth and Fourth Infantry covering them in their rear in columns of battalions, the left of our line resting on the Warrenton turnpike. The Third was advanced to the front and right under cover of a wood, about 1,000 yards distant, where it was deployed as skirmishers.

About 11 a. m. the enemy commenced throwing shells into us from a battery beyond the wood in front of the Third, killing 1 man and wounding several. Butterfield's brigade, which had previously been placed in position on my right, was soon advanced into the wood, and I was directed to advance the four battalions to the front and obliquely to the right, to take up a position in rear and under cover of the woods, which I did in column of battalions, left in front. As soon as notified that I was unmasked by Butterfield I advanced the two battalions of the Fourteenth into and through the woods to his support, and held them there until after his brigade was entirely withdrawn, when my whole column was ordered to the rear. While in the woods we were under a most incessant fire of all arms, but my officers and men behaved admirably. Here it was that Captain O'Connell, of the Fourteenth Infantry, was wounded in the knee while commanding the First Battalion (notwithstanding which he continued with his command throughout the day), and Captain D. B. McKibbin, Fourteenth Infantry, in the ear, while commanding the Second Battalion.

The Third Infantry, meanwhile, had been advanced, and held possession for several hours of two houses, about 100 and 250 yards in front and to the left of the wood, which it held until all the troops were withdrawn from the center. In withdrawing the Third the right wing united with the brigade, and the left, being across the turnpike, united with Warren's brigade, and served with it until the whole division was united on the plateau between the Henry and Robinson houses.

About 5 p. m. the brigade was withdrawn from the wood in admirable order, moving by the fronts of battalions in column, and halted for a short time in rear of Weed's battery, on a line with the Dogan house. From this point I was ordered across the turnpike to a position on the plateau between the Henry and Robinson houses, where the brigade was deployed in line of battle, with its right resting on the Henry house.

About 6 p. m. I was ordered to take the battalion of the Twelfth and Fourteenth to a wood to our left and front, to support Meade's brigade, then severely pressed by the enemy; and almost immediately after placing these troops in position I observed that the Third and Fourth had also been ordered up. I found the enemy in very strong force in the wood, and during the heat of a very severe engagement discovered that he was flanking me with large masses of troops. I immediately commenced to gain ground to my left, so as to meet his movements, and held him in check for nearly an hour. But at length I found the contest too unequal; my command was being cut to pieces; the ammunition of the men nearly expended, and, the enemy's masses vastly outnumbering my force, I was forced to give the order to retire. This was done in most excellent order, the men marching steadily and slowly, and I resumed my position on the plateau. Shortly after I was ordered to retire with my brigade to Centreville, which I did, and reached that

point at 1 o'clock at night, having the entire brigade with me in good order and having left but few stragglers behind.

I cannot omit calling the attention of the brigadier-general commanding to the firm and gallant manner in which my brigade held the enemy in check on the extreme left for such a length of time and finally prevented his turning our flank. At one time the Third and Fourth were within 30 yards of one of his brigades, which made a flank movement to turn their left, when Captain Dryer, commanding the Fourth, gave orders to fire by battalions, and poured three most destructive volleys into it before his fire could be returned. The greatest portion of my loss was at this point, and too much credit cannot be given to officers and men for their coolness and gallantry during this engagement. The Second Battalion of the Fourteenth was under fire for the first time and behaved admirably.

I must beg leave to call attention to Captain Wilkins, commanding Third Infantry; Captain J. B. Collins, commanding the Fourth, wounded, who was succeeded in the command by Captain H. Dryer, this latter officer being especially conspicuous for his coolness and gallantry; Captain J. D. O'Connell, Fourteenth Infantry, commanding First Battalion, severely wounded in several places and behaving most gallantly; and Captain D. B. McKibbin, Fourteenth Infantry, commanding Second Battalion, Fourteenth, who displayed conspicuous gallantry throughout.

Captain Wilkins, Third Infantry, mentions Captain Walker, acting field officer, for coolness and the prompt carrying out of his orders; Lieutenants Sheridan, Whitney, Eckert, and Penrose; Lieutenant Devoe, adjutant, who rendered important services, and behaved with the same indifference to danger which has distinguished him on former occasions. Sergt. Major A. Kaiser, Sergeants Torpy, Mourton, Hopkins, Litzinger, Smith, Hessian, Coady, Schafer, Morris, Hanley, Flynn, Ackland, and Scully, of the Third Infantry, and Sergt. George Lamonion, of the Twelfth Infantry, are especially mentioned.

I would particularly mention my staff-Second Lieutenant W. H. Powell, Fourth Infantry, acting assistant adjutant-general and aide-de-camp, First Lieutenant S. Van Rensselaer, Twelfth Infantry. These officers behaved with the utmost coolness and gallantry, and carried my orders to every part of the field to which they were sent with cheerfulness and alacrity.

My whole brigade behaved as well as I could have expected or desired, and has, I trust, earned the favorable notice of the brigadier-general commanding the division.

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBT. C. BUCHANAN,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Fourth Infantry, Commanding Brigade.

First Lieutenant HEYWARD CUTTING,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Sykes' Division.

Numbers 104. Report of Captain Hiram Dryer, Fourth U. S. Infantry, of the battle of Bull Run.

CAMP NEAR HALL'S HILL, VA.,

September 4, 1862.

SIR: I have the honor to make the following report of the movements of the Fourth Regiment of Regular Infantry on Saturday, the 30th day of august, 1862:

the regiment was formed at daylight near the Manassas Gap Railroad, about 1 mile from its junction with the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, where it had bivouacked for the night, and marched from there to the Alexandria and Warrenton turnpike, near Dogan's house, arriving at about 8 o'clock a. m. The regiment soon after was formed in line of battle in an open field about 400 yards in front of the Dogan house, covering the Twelfth Infantry, and with its left resting on the turnpike. The enemy commenced a vigorous shelling of our position almost immediately, doing but little damage. Our loss in this position was 1 killed and 3 wounded.

at about 12 o'clock we moved forward in line of battle and took position near the woods to the right and front, and about 1,200 yards distant from the Dogan house, where we remained until about 3.30 o'clock p. m., when we were ordered to fall back and take up a position on the plateau in front of the Henry and Robinson houses. In making this movement we passed nearly over the ground that we had been formed on during the early part of the day, and at or about this point Captain Collins was struck on the thigh with a round shot, producing a severe contusion of the thigh, rendering him unfit for further duty on the field. I then assumed command of the regiment. We had not been long in position on the plateau oboe mentioned when we received an order to re-enforce General Meade's brigade, then engaged on the left and about 500 yards in our front. On arriving in rear of General Meade's line, which was lying down and firing from a ditch, I halted the regiment and opened fire by battalion, firing six rounds. The enemy having disappeared in front of this position and moved to his right, where he was massing a large body of troops in a dense forest, I received an order from Colonel Buchanan to move the Fourth to the left.

I immediately placed the regiment about its length to its left, on a road immediately in front of the woods, where the enemy were expected to make their appearance in a few moments. We had not long to wait for them, when we discovered that they were two brigades strong, by battalion in mass, not 20 yards distant. I immediately gave the command to fire by battalion, and we gave them three rounds before they could recover themselves enough to reply. Their loss must have been terrible. I then received an order from Colonel buchanan to retire. I immediately gave the command to face about, and marched in line of battle about 30 yards to the rear, halted and faced about, and gave them another volley.

The enemy's fire having become very severe I here faced about and marched it about 60 yards more, halted and faced about. The left flank of the regiment being covered by one of our own regiments the order was given to fire by wing, firing two rounds, when we were ordered to fall back to our original position on the plateau above mentioned, where we remained but a few moments, then receiving an order to fall in and march to Centreville, arriving there in good order at about 12 o'clock p. m. Our loss during the day was 1 sergeant and 2 privates killed; 1 officer, 1 corporal, and 13 privates wounded.

It gives me much pleasure to say that both officers and men of the regiment behaved throughout the whole day with great gallantry and coolness.

The following-named officers were present with the battalion during the engagement: Joseph B. Collins, captain, commanding regiment; Hiram Dryer, captain, acting field officer; C. H. Carlton, first lieutenant, commanding Company A; A. R. Benedict, first lieutenant, commanding Company B; Thomas A. Martin, first lieutenant, commanding Company H; A. B. Cain, first lieutenant, commanding company I; Alexander Carolina, first lieutenant, commanding Company F; William S. Collier, first lieutenant, commanding Company K; John L. Buell, first lieutenant, temporarily commanding Company G; A. E. Sheldon, second lieutenant, R. P. McKibbin, second lieutenant; George M. Randall, second lieutenant, commanding Company C; Henry W. Patterson, second lieutenant; Solomon G. Krepps, second lieutenant; Samuel P. Crowley, second lieutenant; George Williams, second lieutenant; J. R. Gibson, assistant surgeon.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

HIRAM DRYER,

Captain, Fourth Infantry, Commanding Regiment.

Lieutenant WILLIAM H. POWELL,

Fourth Infantry, Actg. Asst. Adjt. General, Present.

No. 95. Report of Lieutenant Colonel Robert C. Buchanan, Fourth U. S. Infantry, commanding First Brigade, of the battle of Antietam and skirmish at Shepherdstown Ford. OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 19, Part 1 (Antietam)

HEADQUARTERS FIRST BRIGADE REGULAR INFANTRY, Camp near Sharpsburg, Md., September 26, 1862.

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the First Brigade, consisting of the Third and Fourth Infantry, First and Second Battalions of the Twelfth, and First and Second Battalions of the Fourteenth, since leaving Middletown, Md., on the 15th instant.

The brigade crossed South Mountain and reached Porterstown on the 15th, and was placed in position in advance of that place on its arrival. The Third Infantry was thrown out as skirmishers to cover the position. The next morning the Fourth was advanced to the bridge on the turnpike to Sharpsburg crossing the Antietam, to hold it and prevent any attempt of the enemy to destroy it, the Third being brought back to the brigade. Three companies of the Fourth were thrown across the brigade and deployed as skirmishers, the remaining companies being posted on the left of it.

On the morning of the 17th the First Battalion of the Twelfth relieved the Fourth, which then rejoined the brigade. In the afternoon the Fourth and both battalions of the Fourteenth were sent across the bridge, under the command of Captain H. Dryer, commanding Fourth Infantry, who was directed to take with him also the First Battalion of the Twelfth from its position at the brigade, and to take command of any other regular infantry that might be there, to support some batteries of artillery on that side, under the command of Brigadier-General Pleasonton, Volunteers, which was done. At night this command was relieved by a portion of Morell's division of Volunteers, and rejoined the brigade. During the 18th the brigade remained in its first position in front and to the left of Porterstown. On the 19th the brigade moved forward across the brigade and through Sharpsburg to the bank of the Potomac, in pursuit of the retreating enemy. Lieutenant Carlton, Fourth Infantry, with two companies of that regiment, was moved forward in advance, in order to ascertain whether any force of the enemy was in our front, but found none, though he succeeded in capturing several prisoners.

Detailed reports of the operations of the several portion of the brigade are herewith inclosed.

During the afternoon of the 16th many shot and shells were thrown into the brigade, but they did no damage. The officers and men of my command behaved, as usual, with coolness and courage, and are deserving of all praise for the cheerful manner in which their duties were discharged.

To my staff, First Lieutenant S. Van Renseelaer, Twelfth Infantry, acting aide-de-camp, and Second Lieutenant William H. Powell, Fourth Infantry, acting assistant adjutant-general, my thanks are due for the cheerful alacrity and coolness with which they carried my orders to the different portions of the brigade.

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,
ROBT. C. BUCHANAN,

Lieutenant-Colonel Fourth Infantry, Commanding Brigade.

First Lieutenant HEYWARD CUTTING,

Tenth Infantry, Acting. Asst. Adjt. General, Sykes' Division.

No. 97. Report of Captain Hiram Dryer, Fourth U. S. Infantry, of the battle of Antietam.

CAMP NEAR SHARPSBURG, MD., September 25, 1862. OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 19, Part 1 (Antietam)

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part that the Fourth Regiment of Regular Infantry took in the battle of Antietam, on Tuesday and Wednesday, the 16th and 17th instant:

At about 7 o'clock a.m. of the 16th, I received an order from Colonel Buchanan to march the regiment down to take possession of and hold the bridge on the turnpike over the Antietam, distant from where we had bivouacked for the night about 600 yards. On arriving within 200 yards of the bridge, we passed the last of the pickets belonging to the Third Infantry, which were posted behind a stone wall in an orchard to the left of the pike.

I here detached Lieutenant Buell, temporarily commanding Company G, with his company, with orders to advance rapidly on the bridge, which was done without opposition. I marched the remainder of the regiment down, and made the following disposition of them: Companies B, G, K, and I were thrown across the brigade, and posted under cover of a large barn on the left of the pike and under the bank on the right, where we remained quiet for two or three hours, when it was discovered that the enemy was advancing on our position with his pickets on both sides of the turnpike. Companies G and K were thrown out as skirmishers, one to the right and the other to the left of the pike, with orders to hold the enemy's pickets in check, if possible.

It was about this time that the enemy commenced a vigorous shelling of our position and the batteries, on the heights in our rear, which lasted but a short time and did but little damage, wounding 1 sergeant, 1 corporal, and 3 privates, 2 of whom were wounded by the enemy's skirmishers.

The regiment was relieved by the First Battalion, Twelfth Infantry, about sundown, and we returned to our old ground to bivouac for the night. We remained on this ground until about 2 o'clock on Wednesday, when General Sykes gave me an order to cross the Antietam with the Fourth and First Battalion of the Fourteenth, and to take command of all the regular infantry of his division on that side of the creek, consisting in all of the Second and Tenth, commanded by Lieutenant Poland; Fourth, and First Battalion Twelfth, Captain Blunt; First Battalion Fourteenth, Captain Brown; and Second Battalion Fourteenth Captain McKibbin, and support certain batteries which were then under the command of General Pleasonton, and to dislodge the enemy from certain hay-stacks in a field on the right of the pike.

On arriving on the right of Lieutenant Poland's command, which was deployed as skirmishers, with his right resting on the pike and near the crest of the hill that the batteries occupied, I ordered him to advance with his skirmishers to the left and front, and to take possession of some hay-stacks situated in a field about 150 yards to the front and about 400 yards to the left of the pike. I at the same time directed Lieutenant Carlton to deploy the three leading companies of the Fourth, G, I, and K, to the right of the pike, with his left resting on the pike and to advance near the crest of a hill, about 250 yards to the front, using the remaining five companies of the regiment as his support. I then ordered Captain Brown to march his battalion of the Fourteenth in line of battle under cover of a hill, and Lieutenant Poland's skirmishers to a fence near a lane running at right angles with the pike, where he halted and put his men under cover.

I there received an order from Colonel Buchanan to draw in my pickets, which I did about 75 yards, putting my whole line under cover, where we remained until near sundown, when we received an order to return to the other side of the Antietam, which we accomplished about 7.30 o'clock, carrying in our dead and wounded.

The following is a list of the officers present with the regiment during the engagement: Captain Hiram Dryer, commanding regiment; Asst. Surg. J. R. Gibson, medical department; First Lieutenant Caleb H. Carlton, Company A, acting field officer; First Lieutenant Abner R. Benedict, commanding Company B; First Lieutenant Thomas A. Martin, commanding Company H; First Lieutenant Alexander Carolin, commanding Company H; First Lieutenant Alexander Carolin, commanding Company F; First Lieutenant Avery B. Cain, commanding Company I; First Lieutenant John L. Buell, commanding Company G; Second Lieutenant Alexander E. Sheldon, commanding Company A; Second Lieutenant Robert P. McKibbin, commanding Company K; Second Lieutenant George M. Randall, commanding Company C; Second Lieutenant Henry W. Patterson, Company D, acting adjutant; Second Lieutenant Samuel T. Crowley, Company F; Second Lieutenant George S. Williams, Company I.

Very respectfully,

HIRAM DRYER,

Captain Fourth Infantry, Commanding Regiment.

Second Lieutenant WILLIAM H. POWELL,

Adjutant Fourth Infantry, Acting Asst. Adjt. General

No. 184. Report of Lieutenant Colonel Robert C. Buchanan, Fourth U. S. Infantry, commanding First Brigade.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST BRIGADE, REGULAR INFANTRY, Camp near Henry House, Va., December 19, 1862.

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of my brigade during the battle of Fredericksburg, Va.:

The brigade, consisting of the Third and Fourth Regiments, the First and Second Battalions of the Twelfth, and First and Second Battalions of the Fourteenth Infantry, led the advance of the division across the Rappahannock about 4 p.m. on Saturday, the 13th instant, and, after crossing, was moved to the rear of the city by way of Hanover street. On reaching the intersection of this and George street, I was ordered to place my command under cover on this latter street, which I did. Directly after the repulse of Humphreys' division, I was ordered to form my brigade in line of battle in rear of the ditch between Hanover street and the Plank road bridges, and take the enemy's batteries in front at the point of the bayonet. I accordingly formed my line as directed, and notified my brigade of what we were about to do, but before the line, which it was necessary to form by a flank movement, was fully established, I received orders not to advance until further orders, and to keep my men under cover of the ditch. As my command covered more than this space in line, I threw the Third and Fourth Infantry into the cemetery, under cover of the front wall.

About 11 p.m. I was ordered to occupy the line on the crest of the first hill, then occupied by the brigade of Colonel Hall, which was the extreme point that our troops had reached on that side of the Hanover street road.

My command was in position by 12.30 a.m., and remained there until relieved the next night by a portion of Sully's brigade. The position occupied by my brigade was the crest of a hill, terminating on the Hanover street road on the left, and a brick tannery on the Plank road, on the right, and about 250 yards from a stone wall and series of rifle-pits, covering the entire front occupied by the enemy. The ground was slightly descending toward us, and another small hill, rising above it in front, protected by a small field-work, holding two guns, commanded its entire surface. Batteries on other hill on my right enfiladed not only the position occupied by my brigade, but the ground in front also. The ditch, in rear of which I first formed, was about 200 yards in rear, and was about 6 feet wide and 10 feet deep, with some 4 feet of water in it. Between my command and this ditch the ground was a plain, sloping toward it, and this again intersected by another ditch, about 4 feet and 3 feet deep, running through its middle at right angles to the larger one. The enemy occupied some small frame houses on the right of the Plank road, from which they could annoy our line very much. At daylight firing commenced between the pickets, and it was soon found that my position was completely commanded, so that if an individual showed his head above the crest of the hill he was picked off by the enemy's sharpshooters immediately, especially by those on the right.

About 11 a.m. the Third and Fourth Infantry effected an entrance into the tannery with their bayonets, through the brick wall next to Hanover street, and soon after loop-holed the wall on the Plank road, and occupied the windows fronting the enemy, and from these positions drove him from the house and rifle-pits on the right, so that he could not occupy them again during the day.

The most trying test of discipline and courage is to place men in a situation where they are compelled to endure the steady fire of an enemy without having it in their power to return it. This was the case with my command on Sunday, the 14th instant, for soon after the firing commenced I ordered my men not to fire unless they saw something to fire at, with a probability of success, and they obeyed the order as it was given, although their companies comrades were shot down by their side at every moment. For this I ask that they receive credit such as is their due.

The enemy shot my men after they were wounded, and also the hospital attendants as they were converging the wounded off the ground, in violation of every law of civilized warfare. My loss would have been much greater but for our taking possession of the tannery. I was to hold the position to the last extremity, and it was held until after I was relieved by other troops. The enemy was so posted that he virtually cut off all intercourse between my brigade and the city between the break of day and nightfall. My dead were buried on the ground and my wounded brought away.

On the 15th, my brigade was posted in the city and about midnight was designated as the rear guard of the army in its withdrawal to this side of the Rappahannock. This duty was accomplished without loss, save of some stragglers from various volunteer divisions in the field. The straggling was excessive, and the completion of the movement delayed nearly two hours thereby. Why more of them were not captured by the enemy I am at a loss to understand.

We reached this side of the river at 8 a.m., and as soon as the brigade had crossed my rear guard, consisting of one company of the Twelfth and two of the Third, under the command of Captain F. Winthrop, Twelfth Infantry, was ordered across,and the bridge broken up and removed. Some few stragglers made their appearance on the bank after the bridge was broken up, and were brought over in the pontoon boats.

My loss was 2 officers, Lieutenants Benedict and Gensel, Fourth Infantry, severely wounded, and 49 non-commissioned officers and privates killed and wounded.

When all behaved so well it is hard to make distinctions, but I would call attention to First Lieutenant A. R. Benedict, Fourth Infantry, who was wounded while withdrawing his outer picket to place it under cover, after having had 7 or his men wounded.

The reports of the regimental commanders are herewith inclosed.

My staff, consisting of First Lieuts. William H. Powell, Fourth Infantry, acting assistant adjutant-general, and S. Van Rensselaer, Twelfth Infantry, acting aide-de-camp my orders with zeal and alacrity, and discharged their duties to my entire satisfaction.

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBT. C. BUCHANAN,

Lieutenant-Colonel Fourth Infantry, Commanding Brigade.

Captain GEORGE RYAN,

Actg. Asst. Adjt. General, Second Division, Fifth Corps.

No. 186. Report of Captain Hiram Dryer, Fourth U. S. Infantry.

No. 186. Report of Captain Hiram Dryer, Fourth U. S. Infantry.

CAMP NEAR FALMOUTH, VA., December 19, 1862.

SIR: In obedience to instructions received from the headquarters First Brigade Regular Infantry, I have the honor to make the following report of the movements of the Fourth Regiment of Infantry during the seven days commencing on the 11th and ending on the 17th December, 1862:

In accordance with an order received, the regiment broke camp at 4 a.m. on the 11th instant, and proceeded, with the remainder of the brigade, to near the north bank of the Rappahannock, and formed line of battle my battalion, in which position it remained until 2 p.m. on the 13th instant, when it was ordered to cross the river at Fredericksburg. Having crossed, the regiment was then moved through the city, and ordered into position, about sundown, in the cemetery, at the south side of the city. Company B, First Lieutenant Abner R. Benedict being in command, was then thrown out as picket to the right of the pickets of the Third Infantry. At midnight the regiment was ordered to move about 300 yards to the left and front, taking a position, the right resting on a large tannery, and relieving some volunteers that had been posted there in the early part of the evening. As soon as the fog lifted, the next morning, the enemy's rifle-pits were discovered about 100 yards in front, and also that they were occupying some frame houses to the right about 75 yards, and on the opposite side of the road from the tannery, from which they kept a continuous fire upon the right of my regiment, as well as upon our line of pickets, which were lying down in an open field directly in their front. Upon discovering the position that Lieutenant Benedict was in with his company, I ordered him to fall back with his company to a ditch near the cemetery, and from thence to the cemetery itself, if possible. Previous to Lieutenant Benedict making the move, ha had lost 7 men wounded, and, while making it, he himself was wounded severely and 1 sergeant mortally. I then determined to occupy the tannery, (which was a good brick building), and after making loop-holes in the end, and posting a few good men at them as well as at the windows, succeeded in keeping the enemy's fire under until midnight, when we were relieved by a portion of Couch's division of volunteers. The regiment then moved into Fredericksburg, bivouacking for the remainder of the night, and remaining during all the next day and nigh, crossing the river early on the morning of the 16th instant with the brigade, and bivouacked on the old ground, on the north side of the Rappahannock, near Falmouth.

Our loss during the movement was 2 officers severely wounded, 2 sergeants and 2 privates killed, 2 musicians severely wounded, and 3 sergeants and 8 privates wounded.

The following are the names of the officers who were present with the regiment,viz: Captain J. W. Adams, Company K; First Lieutenant A. R. Benedict, Company B (severely wounded); First Lieutenant T. A. Martin, Company H; First Lieutenant A. Carolin, Company F; First Lieutenant W. S.

Collier, Company A; First Lieutenant I. F. Gensel, Company D (Severely wounded); Second Lieutenant G. M. Randall, Company C, acting adjutant; Second Lieutenant S. T. Crowley, Company F; Second Lieutenant G. Williams, Company I, and Second Lieutenant J. Simons, Company G.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

HIRAM DRYER,

Captain Fourth Infantry, Commanding Regiment.

Lieutenant WILLIAM H. POWELL,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

Numbers 182. Report of Brigadier General Romeyn B. Ayres, U. S. Army, commanding First Brigade.

HDQRS. FIRST Brigadier, SECOND DIV., FIFTH ARMY CORPS,
May 9, 1863.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to make a brief report of the part taken by this brigade during the recent operations of this army, extending over a space of ten days.

The command broke camp at 10 a.m. on the 27th ultimo, and encamped for the night near Hartwood Church.

The next day marched to within 3 miles of Kelly's Ford.

Crossed the Rappahannock on the 29th, forded Mountain Creek and the Rapidan, and bivouacked at about 9 p.m. on the right bank, near Fly's Ford.

On the 30th, made a reconnaissance to the United States Ford, and encamped near the Chancellor house.

On May 1, took the Fredericksburg pike, and shortly afterward came upon the enemy, who fell back before us about 1 1/2 miles. On this occasion the command advanced in gallant style, and the line of battle was formed at the double-quick. The object of the forward movement being accomplished, the command was withdrawn, retiring in line of battle and taking up a position parallel to the pike. The enemy appearing on the Plank road, leading across our front, the brigade deployed in line of battle with great promptitude, remaining in that position during the night.

Next day took up a position on a road leading to Scott's Mills, cutting an abatis and remaining in that position until dark; then moved on the pike, and took a position across the road and facing the ford.

Toward morning of the 3rd, moved down the pike, taking a position parallel to it, having the First Corps on our right. Here a strong abatis was cut and a breastwork of earth and logs constructed. In this position the command remained until the morning of the 6th, when it was withdrawn, crossing the Rappahannock at the United States Ford, and reaching the old camp ground about 5 p.m.

The conduct of both officers and men, whether on the march, advancing on the enemy, retiring, or lying in line of battle, has been such as to inspire the greatest confidence. The regimental commanders, Major R. S. Smith, Twelfth Infantry; Captain John D. Wilkins, Third Infantry; Captain Hiram Dryer, Fourth Infantry, and Captain J. B. Hager, Fourteenth Infantry, gave me their hearty support. A wish had only to be expressed and the thing was done. For the details of the operations of each regiment, and the casualties, I refer you to the reports of the regimental commanders, herewith inclosed.

I return my thanks, for assistance rendered, to Captain J. M. Locke, acting assistant adjutant-general, and Lieuts. John M. Brown and J. A. Sayles, of my personal staff; also to First Lieutenant R. C. Parker, Twelfth Infantry, acting assistant inspector-general.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. B. AYRES,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Captain RYAN,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

Numbers 184. Report of Captain Hiram Dryer, Fourth U. S. Infantry.

CAMP NEAR FALMOUTH, VA., May 7, 1863.

SIR: I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of the Fourth Infantry Regiment during the recent movement:

The regiment, consisting of 14 commissioned officers and 206 enlisted men, broke camp at 8 a.m. on the morning of April 27, and marched to camp near Hartwood Church, Va., a distance of 9 miles.

Left camp on the 28th; marched to Ely's Ford, waded across the Rapidan River, and went into camp. Distance marched, 15 miles.

On the 30th, marched to the United States Ford, and returned to bivouac near Chancellorsville, a distance of 12 miles.

May 1.-Left camp; engaged and skirmished with the enemy until 3 p.m., when the regiment was ordered to withdraw, after having helped to drive the enemy a distance of 2 miles. Returned to camp and rested in line of battle; on arms all night. Loss, 1 killed and 1 wounded.

May 2.-Moved to a new camp, about 2 1/2 miles from Chancellorsville, and remained until about 5 p.m., when we were ordered out into a new position, and remained so all night, in line of battle.

May 3.-The regiment intrenched, and remained in that position until May 5.

The regiment was on picket the night of the 5th, and remained so until 6 a.m. on the morning of the 6th, when it was withdrawn and ordered to recross the Rappahannock River.

Having crossed the river, the regiment moved back to its camp near Falmouth, Va., arriving about 4 p.m. Distance marched, 16 miles. One man wounded while on picket.

The following are the names of the officers who were with the regiment during the movement: Captain Hiram Dryer, commanding regiment; Second Lieutenant John Simons, regimental adjutant; Captain Julius W. Adams, acting field officer; Asst. Surg. B. Knickerbocker; First. Lieutenant T. A. Martin, commanding Company H; First Lieutenant A. B. Cain, commanding Company C; First Lieutenant A. Carolin, commanding Company F; First Lieutenant W. S. Collier, commanding Company K; First Lieutenant A. E. Sheldon; Second Lieuts. John Miller, Samuel T. Crowley, J. J. S. Hassler, G. W. Dost, George Atcheson, and Gerhard L. Luhn.

Assistant Surgeon Knickerbocker, together with all the officers and enlisted men, behaved with the utmost gallantry.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

HIRAM DRYER,

Captain Fourth Infantry, Commanding Regiment.

Captain JOSEPH M. LOCKE, A. A. A. G., First Brigade.

Numbers 206. Report of Captain Julius W. Adams, Jr., Fourth U. S. Infantry. HEADQUARTERS FOURTH U. S. INFANTRY,
July 17, 1863.

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the Fourth U. S. Infantry in the engagement fought in and around Gettysburg, Pa., on July 2, 3, and 4: The night of July 1 was passed on the Hanover and Gettysburg road, 5 miles east of the latter place. On the morning of July 2, we broke camp at 4 o'clock, and marched 3 miles in a westerly direction. Halting, we there formed line of battle parallel to the road and about half a mile to the right of it. We remained in this position about one hour, when we recrossed the road, and, forming line of battle at right angles to it, moved in the

direction of Gettysburg. Leaving the city on our right, we halted at about 1 p. m. at about 2 miles from the position of our first line of battle. We lay on our arms here until 4 p. m. ; then moving to the front down a road, we took up position in line of battle below the crest of a slight eminence lying between the two ranges of hills occupied, respectively, by our own and the enemys forces. We remained here about half an hour, when, in consequence of the troops on our right retiring and thus exposing us to a flank fire, we were ordered to fall back. Retiring across the open ground, we formed line of battle in the edge of the woods skirting the hills occupied by our forces, where we remained until 7 p. m., and then changed our position to one about 300 yards to the left, where we encamped for the night. In this position we remained all of the 3rd and until 10 a. m. on July 4, when we were ordered on a reconnaissance. Forming in line of battle, supporting a line of skirmishers, we advanced to a position about 1 1/2 miles beyond our camp. The object of the reconnaissance being accomplished, we fell back to our original position. From this we moved at 3 p. m., and relieved the Third Division, Fifth Corps, on picket, throwing our picket line half a mile beyond the position previously occupied by them. Here we remained until 5 p. m. on July 5, when we took up our line of march for Emmitsburg, Md. Our loss in the engagement of July 2 was 9 enlisted men killed, Second Lieutenant George Williams and 27 enlisted men wounded. Our casualties on the 4th were, Second Lieutenant Samuel T. Crowley and 2 enlisted men wounded. The officers engaged were, Captain J. W. Adams, jr., commanding regiment; Second Lieutenant John Simons, adjutant; First Lieutenant A. R. Benedict, commanding Company C; First Lieutenant Thomas A. Martin, commanding Company H; First Lieutenant Alexander Carolin, commanding Company F; First Lieutenant William S. Collier, commanding Company K; First Lieutenant Alexander E. Sheldon; First Lieutenant Henry W. Patterson, regimental quartermaster, on temporary duty at brigade headquarters; Second Lieutenant Samuel T. Crowley, wounded slightly July 4; Second Lieutenant George Williams, severely wounded July 2, right leg amputated; Second Lieutenants John Miller, J. J. Scipio Hassler, George W. Dost, George Atcheson, Gerhard L. Luhn, and Captain S. M. Sprole, unattached. I have the honor to state that both the officers and enlisted men behaved with great gallantry during the engagement.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JULIUS W. ADAMS, JR.,

Captain Fourth U. S. Infantry, Commanding Regiment.

Captain F. WINTHROP,

Actg. Asst. Adjt. General, First Brigade, Regular Infantry.

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