FOURTH U.S. INFANTRY REGIMENT: HOME of HEROES

4th Infantry, 4th Infantry Regiment, Warrior Battalion 1/4, INF 2/4 INF, 3/4 INF,

4th Infantry Regiment - 1944-1945 Fort Benning, GA

The 4th Infantry Regiment was assigned to the United States Army Replacement and and School Command as demonstration troops for the U.S. Army Infantry School from 1944-1945.

An NCO from the 4th Infantry Regiment receives the Combat Infantry Badge for actions in WWII in the Aleutian Islands.

2nd Battalion 4th Infantry Regiment 1 November 1944 - 1 February 1947

 

The 2nd Battalion 4th Infantry Regiment was assigned to the 25th Infantry Division in Japan for Occupation Duty.

01 Nov 1945 to 31 Jan 1947 2nd BN 4th Infantry Regiment 25th ID Occupation duty in Japan, replaced the 161st Infantry. The incumbent personnel and equipment were reassigned to the 4th Infantry Division, which was at Camp Butner, North Carolina, while the regimental records and accouterments were forwarded to Japan to establish a unit for occupation duty. Commanders in Japan faced a continuous struggle to balance occupation duties with maintaining combat readiness and for the most part occupation duties took priority. For example, when a serious epidemic of typhus erupted in Osaka the 4th Infantry Regiment was used to deploy some three hundred teams to work with the Japanese authorities in successfully eliminating the disease among the Japanese with DDT and inoculations.

The 24th Infantry Regiment replaced the 4th Infantry Regiment 1 February 1947.

This iteration of the 4th Infantry Regiment was inactivated on 31 January 1947, at Osaka, Japan. The records and accouterments were returned to the United States and the 4th Infantry Regiment was relieved from assignment to the 25th Division on 1 February 1947.

 

4th Regimental Combat Team 1948-1955

 

The 4th Regimental Combat Team was activated 1 October 1948 at Fort Lewis, Washington. Ulitmately, the 4th RCT would be assigned to the Alaskan Defense Command to provide ground security for the Strategic Air Command (SAC) bases.The 4th Infantry was the core organization from which the combat team was built around. The 4th Regimental Combat Team served in Alaska from 1949 to 1955.

Colonel Max. Gooler was the first commander of the 4th Regimental Combat Team. Colonel Gooler during World War 2 was captured at Tobruk and spent the war in a German POW Camp. He died in 1991. The various units which constitute the 4th Regimental Combat Team were as follows:

- 4th Infantry Regiment

- 36th Field Artillery Battalion

- 501st Quartermaster Service Company

- 63rd Signal Service Company

- 26th Ordnance Service Company

- 517th Engineer Combat Company

- 59th Engineer Construction Company

Company A Mess Hall at Fort Richardson, Alaska around 1950.

After 1955 it was transfered to Fort Devins and then in 1957 was inactivated when the Army adopted the "Battle Group" system. The regiment was then re-titled the 2nd Battle Group, 4th Infantry and assigned to the 3rd Infantry Division in Germany around 1961.

4th Infantry Regiment 1948-2001

 

1st Battation -Assigned to Fort Richardson, Alaska, and participating in Operation Sweetbriar, an exercise to determine if Alaska could be defended if an attack from the Soviet Union.

It was then was assigned as an organic element of the 71st Infantry Division on 10 October 1954.

On 15 September 1956, the 4th Infantry was assigned to the 4th Regimental Combat Team for the second time in this capacity and served for nearly a year. On 1 July 1957, the colors of Company B were relieved from assignment to the 4th Regimental Combat Team, reorganized and redesigned Headquarters Company, 2d Battle Group, 4th Infantry, and assigned as an organic element of the 3d Infantry Division with duty station at Fort Benning, Georgia. The remaining companies and a mortar battery to comprise the 2d Battle Group, 4th Infantry were organized for the 1st and 2d Battalions, 15th Infantry Regiment which were already stationed at Fort Benning.

On 22 July 1957, Colonel Seymore B. Satterwhite assumed command of the 2d Battle Group, 4th Infantry and by 20 July all personnel of the battle group were thoroughly oriented on the ROCID concept. By 15 September 1957 the battle group had completed its organization under ROCID TO&E 7-11T, 1956, thus cadre training commenced in preparation for receiving 1,189 new soldiers straight from civilian life that would bring the unit to combat strength. The 2d Battle Group, 4th Infantry received the first 26 men on 12 November 1957. The remainder of the men arrived shortly after, and all of the men completed their basic training in time to go on leave for Christmas. When they returned in January, training was resumed, and training of all phases was completed by 3 April 1958. On 15 February 1958, it officially was reorganized and redesignated Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battle Group, 4th Infantry and assigned to the U.S. 3rd Infantry Division.

On that same date, the 1st Battle Group, 4th Infantry was assigned to the separate 2d Infantry Brigade.

Embarkation leaves were held during April, and on 13 May 1958, the 2nd Battle Group, 4th Infantry boarded the USNS Rose for Bremerhaven, Germany. The unit arrived in Bremerhaven on 22 May 1958 and reached Bamberg on 24 May 1958.

On 2 April 1962, the 1st Battle Group, 4th Infantry was inactivated at Fort Devens, Massachusetts.

On 18 April 1963 the 2d Battle Group, 4th Infantry was relieved from assignment to the 3d Infantry Division and the 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry was redesignated and assigned to the 3d Infantry Division. On 3 June 1963, the 2d Battle Group, 4th Infantry was inactivated in Germany and on 5 June 1963 the 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry was activated. The 2d Battle Group, 4th Infantry would later be activated (21 July 1969) as the 2nd Battalion, 4th Infantry at Fort Campbell, Kentucky. The 3d Battle Group, 4th Infantry would become the 3d Battalion, 4th Infantry and be inactivated at Fairfield, Illinois on 31 December 1965.

In 1965, the 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry joined the 3d Brigade, 3d Infantry Division in Aschaffenburg, Germany. Taking part in the many REFORGER training exercises in Germany. The battalion was named "Warrior" Battalion in 1966 to commemorate the long service by the regiment between fighting wars and later protecting Indians in Florida, the Pacific Northwest, and the Great Plains.

The 2d Battalion, 4th Infantry was reactivated on 21 July 1969. On 18 September 1970, the 56th Field Artillery Brigade, headquartered in Schwaebisch Gmuend, Federal Republic of Germany, assumed control of three Pershing missile firing battalions. The newly arrived 2d Battalion, 4th Infantry provided the infantry defensive support for the missile units. The unit defended the missile battalions from intruding protesters, from the Nationalist Green Party and other elements.

The mission of the 2d Battalion, 4th Infantry was to provide armed security including patrols of the Pershing nuclear missile and missile storage sites — Muetlangen Missile Storage Site (Company A), Von Steuben (Company B), and Red Leg (Company C) Combat Alert Sites (CAS) additional duties included protecting Pershing nuclear systems in the field and dealing with numerous anti-nuclear protests. It also pursued a rigorous infantry training schedule. Initially, HHC (Hurons) and Company A (Apaches) were stationed at Panzer Kaserne in Stuttgart; Company B (Blackfeet) was stationed at Nelson Kaserne in Neu Ulm; and, Company C (Cherokees) was stationed at Wharton Barracks in Heilbronn.

The 2d Battalion, 4th Infantry participated in major exercises each winter at training areas such as Baumholder, Hohenfels Hohenfels, Wildflecken, and Grafenwoehr. This helped to prepare the unit for encounters with Warsaw Pact military forces in the event of an assault on the missile sites. This was considered a very real possibility during the years of the Cold War. In addition each of the line companies rotated each year to Doughboy City, Berlin to train in military operations in an urban terrain (MOUT).

On 18 August 1971, soldiers from the heavy mortar platoon from battalion headquarters were being transported from Ludwigsburg to Grafenwoehr for live fire training exercises aboard a CH-47A helicopter. The helicopter crashed and exploded, killing all 38 on board, including four members of the 4th Aviation Company.

In May 1983, the 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry began to reorganize to the Division 86 concept in the Army of Excellence program by President Ronald Reagan, with the expectation of stopping a Soviet invasion of West Germany at the “Hofsburg Throat.” This caused the battalion to expand to four rifle companies, an anti-armor company and a very large headquarters and headquarters company.

In May 1984, the 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry began to transition to the Bradley Infantry Fighting Vehicle. The transition was completed in August 1984. In the late 1980s the government again began to reduce the armed forces and the 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry was listed for inactivation, which took place on 16 December 1987 and the unit was relieved from assignment to the 3d Infantry Division. However, the battalion until then known as 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry (Warrior Battalion), then stationed in Aschaffenburg Germany, was reflagged as the 4th Battalion, 7th Infantry (Fighting Fourth), and remained in place as part of the 3d Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division.

The signing of the Intermediate Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty (1987), the fall of the Berlin Wall 1989), and the demise of the Soviet Union (1991) signaled the end of the Cold War and resulted in the eventual inactivation of the 2nd Battalion, 4th Infantry. In May 1991, the 56th Field Artillery Command and all its subordinate units were inactivated. In the summer of 1990, Company C moved from its Pershing II mission and provided security for Operation Steel Box/Golden Python (chemical weapons retrograde from Germany) at Miesau Army Depot. The unit deployed to secure the temporary storage area at the Miesau rail head, guarding over 100,000 toxic chemical artillery projectiles in steel shipping containers. Company C received the Army Superior Unit Award for flawless execution of this security mission. In November 1990, Company C was the first of the 2d Battalion units to move to the CMTC – Hohenfels, Germany to reactivate as Company C, 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry and assume role as OPFOR. The 1st Battalion 4th Infantry Regiment deployed in 2006 to Afghanistan, then has continuously supplied Company sized units for deployments to Afghanistan until 2011.

The 2d Battalion, 4th Infantry was inactive until 2004 when it was reactivated at Fort Polk, Louisiana as part of the 4th Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division. The 2d Battalion, 4th Infantry deployed in support of the Global War on Terrorism to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in 2006-2007, Operation Iraqi Freedom 2008-2010 and Operation Enduring Freedom 2011-2012 and again 2013-2014 .

The 3d Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment was reactivated on 16 October 2009 in Germany as part of the 170th Infantry Brigade. The 3rd Battalion was deployed in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in 2010-2011. Upon return it was deactivated in 2012.

2nd Battalion, 4th Infantry "Pershing" 1968 - 1990

In 1968 the decision was made to provide a ground defense force for the Pershing I medium-range nuclear missiles deployed in West Germany.  The 2nd battalion was activated at Fort Campbell and transferred to Germany and assumed ground defense and security duties for the missile systems. 

The missiles were stored when not in the field at Mutlangen and Heilbronn (near Stuttgart, Germany) and Lehmgrube (near Ulm/Neu Ulm, Germany.)

 

 

With the deployment of the Pershing II missile to Europe in the early 1980’s to replace the aging Pershing I missile the Pershing sites became the focus of massive anti-nuclear demonstrations particularly around Easter.  Nevertheless, the deployment of the missiles continued until the signing of a treaty eliminating medium range missiles singed between the United States and the Soviet Union in 1988.

 

In 1990 the battalion was inactivated and the personnel re-flagged as 1st battalion, 4th Infantry and assigned to Hohenfels MTA.

 

Soldiers from A 2-4 Infantry Regiment in the 1970s(Germany).

 

2-4 Infantry Regiment receives the High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV) in the 1980s replacing the M1151 Jeep..

 

 

A Co 2-4 Infantry Regiment at Wildflecken, Bad Kissingen, Germany, September 1990. The Wildflecken Kaserne was decommissioned by the U.S.Army and transferred to the Bundeswehr in 1994 after a drawdown that began in 1991.

This was the last major training event for 2-4 Infantry Regiment before being deactiviated and reflagged in Hohensfels, Germany to assume the OPFOR mission in 1991 as 1st Battalion 4th Infantry Regiment (Warriors)

 

 

Honor Roll

While returning from a live-fire training at Grafenwöhr the entire heavy mortar platoon of HHC, 2/4 Infantry died in a helicopter crash over Pegnitz in August 1971.   The cause of the crash was determined to have been metal fatigue in one of the CH-47s rotors. 

 

Killed in the Crash:

John E. Echterling 1st Lt.
Henry L. Pittard Jr. 1st Lt.
Paten L. Smith SSgt.
Terry E. Bowerman Sgt.
George J. Gongaware Sgt.
Christopher W. Pyzik Sgt.
Harold D. Dillaman Jr. Sgt.
Russell L. Schroder Spec. 5
Fernando Apodaca Spec. 4
Ronald F. Scholl Spec. 4
Arthur R. Kearney Pfc.
Roger M. Hartman Pfc.
Ronald R. Pestka Pfc.
Eric L. Landry Pfc.
Samuel M. Cherry Pfc.
David P. Dunks Pfc.
David W. Stover Pfc.
Michael L. Annis Pfc.
Raymond T. Gadbois Pfc.
Lawrence H. Karaschin Pfc.
David A. Person Pfc.
Paul E. Hickson Pfc.
Charles E. Fife Pfc.
Jeffery M. Vickerman Pfc.
Eddie W. Nichols Pfc.
Vernon J. Ailstock Jr. Pfc.
Noel Velez Pfc.
Mark P. Connors Pfc.
Edward A. Monnin Jr. Pfc.
Raymond H. Cork Pfc.
Clarence C. West Pfc.
John P. Egelund Pfc.

Also killed were four crewmembers from the 4th Aviation company
15th Aviation Group.

 

3rd Infantry Division

2nd Battle Group, 4th Infantry Regiment - Warner Barracks, Bamberg (1958)

1st Battalion (Mechanized), 4th Infantry Regiment - Wharton Bks, Heilbronn (1963)

1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment - Fiori Bks, Aschaffenburg (1984)

19 Dec 1957
Cloth Patches Mark Uniforms
A new splash of color will mark the clothing and field jackets of 3d Division Marnemen when assuming NATO duties in Germany. New cloth patches bearing the insignia of the Division's twenty-one units are arriving. The colorful insignia whose symbols tell a long story of heroic military service will be worn over the left pocket of fatigue and field jackets.

 

24 May 1958
Fourth Infantry Arrives in Bamberg
Following months of combat training preparation, the 4th Infantry arrived in Bamberg to take command of vital NATO duty in Bamberg. The Division Commander was on hand to view the impressive flag changing ceremony between the newly trained unit and the 2d Battle Group, 15th Infantry.

Preparing for War 2004-Present

LTC Frank Sturek arrived at Fort Polk, LA to an empty motor pool observing what was soon to

Warriors Return 2009-2012

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OPFOR ROLE - 1990-Present

 

On 16 November 1990, 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry was assigned as the Opposing Force (OPFOR) at the Combat Maneuver Training Center (CMTC), Hohenfels, Germany. The battalion consists of three rifle companies, a tank company, a Combat Support Company, and a headquarters and headquarters company. The combat support company was disbanded in 1995 and the platoons reassigned to the HHC. In order to support the USAERUR commander’s training strategy the battalion portrays a brigade tactical group or an insurgency that challenges all the battlefield operating systems of rotational units in force-on-force situations.

The battalion has trained units deploying to Bosnia, Kosovo, Iraqi, and Afghanistan during high intensity conflict rotations, and mission readiness exercises. Additionally, the battalion has deployed forces to other countries to take part in training exercises to include the training of security forces for the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, Greece.

In addition to its OPFOR mission, the battalion has the same training requirements as other infantry battalions in the army. The battalion conducts squad external evaluations, tank gunnery, antitank gunnery, training for urban operations, marksmanship, and live fire exercises.

2nd Battalion 4th Infantry Regiment 1 November 1944 - 1 February 1947

 

The 2nd Battalion 4th Infantry Regiment was assigned to the 25th Infantry Division in Japan for Occupation Duty.

01 Nov 1945 to 31 Jan 1947 2nd BN 4th Infantry Regiment 25th ID Occupation duty in Japan, replaced the 161st Infantry. Commanders in Japan faced a continuous struggle to balance occupation duties with maintaining combat readiness and for the most part occupation duties took priority. For example, when a serious epidemic of typhus erupted in Osaka the 4th Infantry Regiment was used to deploy some three hundred teams to work with the Japanese authorities in successfully eliminating the disease among the Japanese with DDT and inoculations.

The 24th Infantry Regiment replaced the 4th Infantry Regiment 1 February 1947.

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